Six months after the revelation that computer hackers had targeted Sony, leading to the release of a range of confidential information, Fortune has published an extensive investigative piece about the failure that led to the massive breach of security.

Read the first installment of the three-part series HERE.

After the November revelations — which included private emails, scripts of unreleased films and staff salaries — cyber-security experts were called in to better understand how the company had been compromised. Once inside the headquarters, the Norse Corp security experts were stunned by the striking lack of security in their Info Sec department. As one of them explains, the janitor could have walked in the room and taken control of the system.

Fortune's investigation was led by correspondent Peter Elkind, and includes interviews with present and past Sony executives, cyber-security experts and law enforcement officials. With the Sony example in mind, Elkind also tackles the wider subject of American companies' preparedness regarding this new type of threat.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: Fortune is a national triweekly American business magazine published by Time Inc. The magazine was founded in 1929 by Henry Luce.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Coronavirus

Why U.S. Vaccine Diplomacy In Latin America Makes "Good" Sense

Echoing its cultural diplomacy of the early 20th century, the United States is gifting vaccines to Latin America as part of a renewed "good neighbor'' policy.

Waiting to get the vaccine in Nezahualcoyotl, Mexico

Andrea Matallana

-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — Just before and during World War II, the United States' Good Neighbor policy proved a very effective strategy to improve ties with Latin America. Initiated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the policy's main goal was non-interference and non-intervention. The U.S. would instead focus on reciprocal exchanges with their southern neighbors, including through art and cultural diplomacy.

Keep reading... Show less
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS
MOST READ