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New York Magazine, July 26, 2015

"Cosby: The Women, An Unwelcome Sisterhood," the cover of New York Magazine's latest issue reads. In a striking black-and-white cover image, 35 women who say they were raped by comedian Bill Cosby are photographed together. The dates of their respective attacks are written below each woman. Among the alleged victims who have spoken out (there have been 46 in total) are actress Beverly Johnson, supermodel Janice Dickinson and one of the stars of The Cosby Show TV series, Lily Bernard.

The magazine cover story comes after the 77-year-old Cosby denied all sexual assault allegations last Wednesday and asserted that one of his accusers, Andrea Constand, was slandering him by leaking evidence he gave to a court 10 years ago.

While Cosby has always declared his innocense, the allegations that first became public in October 2014 have ended his acting career and destroyed his reputation.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: New York Magazine covers culture and politics and is based in New York.

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Russia

How The War In Ukraine Could Overturn Everyone's Plans For The Arctic

Russia owns 60% of Arctic coastline and half of the region's population. In recent history, NATO has not been overly concerned with the defense of the Arctic region because the U.S. military has been focused on the Middle East. This is all changing since Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

Photo of employees walking through frozen installations at the Utrenneye field in Murmansk Region, Russia.

At the Utrenneye field in Murmansk Region, Russia.

Kateryna Mola

-Analysis-

KYIV — As important as the Arctic is for studying climate control and ecology, various states have eyes on it for another reason: resources. Climate change has made the Arctic more accessible for mining, and much of that area is in the Russian Arctic. In order to exploit these potential natural resources, Russia turned to foreign investors and foreign technology, from both the West and China. The war in Ukraine is throwing all of that into question.

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Russia's invasion of Ukraine will have a profoundly devastating impact on the development of Russian Arctic infrastructure, as well as shipping routes through the Arctic. Western companies have left or are about to leave the market, and counter-sanctions threaten those who still cooperate with the Russians.

Given that Russia does not produce the sophisticated equipment to operate in such a complex region and soon will not even be able to repair the equipment it possesses, we can expect Russia's activity in the Arctic to slow down.

Yet, Vladimir Putin has continued to emphasize the Arctic as a priority region, and extended invitations to cooperate to both India and China.

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