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New York Magazine, July 26, 2015

"Cosby: The Women, An Unwelcome Sisterhood," the cover of New York Magazine's latest issue reads. In a striking black-and-white cover image, 35 women who say they were raped by comedian Bill Cosby are photographed together. The dates of their respective attacks are written below each woman. Among the alleged victims who have spoken out (there have been 46 in total) are actress Beverly Johnson, supermodel Janice Dickinson and one of the stars of The Cosby Show TV series, Lily Bernard.

The magazine cover story comes after the 77-year-old Cosby denied all sexual assault allegations last Wednesday and asserted that one of his accusers, Andrea Constand, was slandering him by leaking evidence he gave to a court 10 years ago.

While Cosby has always declared his innocense, the allegations that first became public in October 2014 have ended his acting career and destroyed his reputation.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: New York Magazine covers culture and politics and is based in New York.

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Society

Her Mad Existence: The Ultimate Collection Of Evita Perón Iconography

Seventy years after her death, displays in Buenos Aires, including a vast collection of pictures shown online, recall the life and times of "Evita" Perón, the Argentine first lady turned icon of popular culture.

A bookstore in San Telmo, a neighborhood of Buenos Aires, Argentina, displays pictures of Eva Perón.

Maxi Kronenberg

BUENOS AIRES — Her death in 1952 at the age of 33 helped turn the Argentine first lady Eva Perón — known to millions as Evita — into one of the iconic faces of the 20th century, alongside other Argentines like the singer Carlos Gardel, the guerrilla leader Ernesto "Che" Guevara, and soccer stars Maradona and Messi.

Evita, née María Eva Duarte, became for many the defender of the poor — and to her detractors, the mother of Latin America's brazen populists — as she pushed for civil rights, gender equality and social programs for the poor in her time as first lady of Argentina in the mid-20th century.

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