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Nigeria

Extra! Army Rescues 293 Boko Haram Hostages

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Vanguard, April 29, 2015

Nigerian troops fighting against Islamist group Boko Haram announced the rescue of 293 girls and women held hostage by the jihadists, newspaper Vanguard reports on Wednesday. It’s unclear how many, if any, of those rescued were among the 200 girls abducted in a school in Chibok in April 2014 that captured the world's attention.

The army also said it had cleared “four key terrorist camps” and seized weapons. “Our gallant troops have been making progress in the desired aim of ridding the nation of terrorists and their sanctuaries,” an official statement read.

ABOUT THE SOURCE: Vanguard is a daily newspaper published by Vanguard Media, based in Lagos, Nigeria. Vanguard Media was founded in 1983.

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Green Or Gone

Tracking The Asian Fishing "Armada" That Sucks Up Tons Of Seafood Off Argentina's Coast

A brightly-lit flotilla of fishing ships has reappeared in international waters off the southern coast of Argentina as it has annually in recent years for an "industrial harvest" of thousands of tons of fish and shellfish.

Photo of dozens of crab traps

An estimated 500 boats gather annually off the coast of Patagonia

Claudio Andrade

BUENOS AIRES — The 'floating city' of industrial fishing boats has returned, lighting up a long stretch of the South Pacific.

Recently visible off the coast of southern Argentina, aerial photographs showed the well-lit armada of some 500 vessels, parked 201 miles offshore from Comodoro Rivadavia in the province of Chubut. The fleet had arrived for its vast seasonal haul of sea 'products,' confirming its annual return to harvest squid, cod and shellfish on a scale that activists have called an environmental blitzkrieg.

In principle the ships are fishing just outside Argentina's exclusive Economic Zone, though it's widely known that this kind of apparent "industrial harvest" does not respect the territorial line, entering Argentine waters for one reason or another.

For some years now, activists and organizations like Greenpeace have repeatedly denounced industrial-style fishing as exhausting marine resources worldwide and badly affecting regional fauna, even if the fishing outfits technically manage to evade any crackdown by staying in or near international waters.

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