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La Nación(Argentina) January 20 2015

Protests denouncing Argentine President Cristina Kirchner erupted all over the country Monday after prosecutor Alberto Nisman was found dead Sunday morning. Authorities are calling the death an apparent suicide, but protestors believe he may have been murdered for accusing the president of concealing Iranian culpability for the 1994 bombing that killed 85 and injured 300 at a Jewish community center.

Nisman's death came just hours before he was scheduled to give damning testimony at a congressional hearing. Days before his death, Nisman spoke to daily newspaper Clarin, saying, "I could end up dead because of this."

The thousands of protesters carried signs that said "Yo soy Nisman," borrowing from the "Je suis Charlie" and "Je suis Juif" marches that followed recent terror attacks in France. Other placards included, "Asking for justice is defending democracy," and "Enough with the lies."

The investigation into Nisman's death is ongoing, with a coroner due to make a final ruling in the days to come.

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food / travel

Denied The Nile: Aboard Cairo's Historic Houseboats Facing Destruction

Despite opposition, authorities are proceeding with the eviction of residents of traditional houseboats docked along the Nile in Egypt's capital, as the government aims to "renovate" the area – and increase its economic value.

Houseboats on the Nile in Zamalek, Cairo

Ahmed Medhat and Rana Mamdouh

With an eye on increasing the profitability of the Nile's traffic and utilities, the Egyptian government has begun to forcibly evict residents and owners of houseboats docking along the banks of the river, in the Kit Kat area of Giza, part of the Greater Cairo metropolis.

The evictions come following an Irrigation Ministry decision, earlier this month, to remove the homes that have long docked along the river.

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