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"Nothing but debris and bodies" reads French daily Libération"s front page, conveying the state of shock and disbelief around Europe the day after an Airbus A320 carrying 150 people crashed in the southern French Alps.

According to Alain Vidalies, France's junior minister of transport, there were no survivors from the crash of flight 4U9525. Search operations for the plane's black boxes resumed Wednesday morning in the hard-to-reach area. Retrieving and identifying the 150 bodies will take weeks, Marseille Prosecutor General Brice Robin said.

French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve said one of the plane's two black boxes was recovered from the crash site. It is reportedly "in a damaged but usable" state, and will help shed light on the causes of the crash. So far, no hypotheses have been ruled out.

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Sixty-seven Germans, 45 Spaniards, two Australians and three Britons were on board the plane that was travelling from Barcelona to Dusseldorf.

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"Not arrived" writes Berlin-based Die Tageszeitung, together with a simple yet poignant picture of an airport flight information screen in Düsseldorf, where the plane — operated by Germanwings, a Lufthansa budget airline — was supposed to land.

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"Under shock," headlines Hamburg Morgenpost as 67 German passengers — including 16 students and their two teachers returning from a school exchange — are among the victims of the crash.

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Spanish daily El Mundo featured a picture of the crash site, while wondering why "The plane fell for 8 minutes without sending a mayday call." (Investigators now believe the aircraft actually slowly lost altitude for 18 minutes)

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Flight 4U9525 took off from Barcelona's airport, but it was a "Flight without a destination," writes Spanish daily ABC.

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