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Euro 2016: Anticipation And Security Fears On Front Pages

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Le Parisien, June 10

"It's time to party!" reads the front page of French daily Le ParisienFriday, which features a photograph of supporters celebrating the opening ceremony of the 2016 UEFA European soccer championship at the Eiffel Tower.

The tournament kicks off on Friday with Romania facing France. The latter could do with a bit of cheer: The country has been crippled by strikes aimed at its oil refineries and transport services.

Moreover, the location of the first game, the Stade de France, was one of the places attacked by militants on Nov. 13, 2015, prompting questions on the safety of the tournament. Such security fears are visible on international front pages Friday.

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Al Akhbar, June 10

Egyptian daily Al Akbharshows two French soldiers patroling the area around the Eiffel Tower, lit up in the colors of the French national flag. "A glimmer of light in the darkness of France," notes the headline.

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Público, June 10

The front page of the Portuguese paper Público features a photograph of French soldiers doing the rounds at a "fan zone" in the French city of Nice. Experts say that these zones, which are designated spots for thousands of fans to gather at to watch the tournament, are a security nightmare. Portugal is participating in the tournament despite the safety risks.

About 90,000 French police and army personnel are deployed to secure the Euro championship, which will end on July 10, 2016.

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