Drug Abuse Causes Half Of All Iranian Divorces, Says Interior Minister

Iran's Interior Minister Abdolreza Rahmani-Fazli is blaming drug addiction for just over half of all divorces in Iran, warning that "youth addiction to drugs" is growing, the official IRNA agency reports.

"The judiciary has declared that the reason for 55% of divorces is one partner being addicted to drugs," the minister told a Tehran conference Thursday. He also said that 70% of Iran's prisoners were jailed for drug-related offenses, though many of them were minor. Iran, meanwhile, executes traffickers.

Iran is adjacent to two of the world's main drug producers, Afghanistan and Pakistan, and its territory is both saturated with drugs and acts as a corridor for their westward exportation.

The minister described drugs as "the mother of all problems," saying that many families ask authorities for the "arrest or execution" of their addicted children. There are currently an estimated 1.3 million addicts in Iran, he said.

— Ahmad Shayegan

Photo: Harvested opium poppy capsules — Zyance

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