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El País, Jan. 26, 2016

Spain is waving a red flag at famous bullfighter Francisco Rivera Ordóñez after he posted a picture of himself taunting a bloody calf while holding his five-month-old daughter.

Ordóñez posted the photograph, featured Tuesday on the front page of Spain's leading daily El País, on his official Instagram account a day before.

The caption reads: "Carmen's debut, she's the 5th generation of fighters in our family . My grandfather and my father were bullfighters. My dad did this with me and I've done it with my daughter Cayetana and now with Carmen #bloodpride"

Bullfighting remains a highly divisive tradition in the country, with supporters defending it as cultural heritage and animal rights activists denouncing it as a gory spectacle.

El País reports that other bullfighters came to Ordóñez's defense, posting similar shots on both Twitter and Instagram, while Spain's Health Minister Alfonso Alonso commented that the torero"s picture was "not suitable for minors" and that he would receive "a warning."

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China

Peng Shuai, A Reckoning China's Communist Party Can't Afford To Face

The mysterious disappearance – and brief reappearance – of the Chinese tennis star after her #metoo accusation against a party leader shows Beijing is prepared to do whatever is necessary to quash any challenge from its absolute rule.

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Yan Bennett and John Garrick

Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai's apparent disappearance may have ended with a smattering of public events, which were carefully curated by state-run media and circulated in online clips. But many questions remain about the three weeks in which she was missing, and concerns linger over her well-being.

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