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At Last! Chicago Cubs, Champions After 108 Years

It took them 108 years, but the Chicago Cubs finally won the World Series after what reporters are describing as "the greatest World Series Game 7 ever."

This is how the Chicago Tribune described the decisive game against the Cleveland Indians that lasted into the early hours Thursday: It "lasted almost five hours, featuring some wacky plays, a blown four-run lead, a 17-minute rain delay and some 10th inning heroics that sealed the deal. ... This is not a dream. The Cubs did it."

"At Last!" was the headline on the hometown daily's front page, capturing the feeling every living Cubs fan is sharing this morning.

After going down three games to one in the series, the Cubs won the final three games, including the last two in Cleveland. With its World Series win, the 2016 Cubs ended the worst championship drought in baseball history. They also handed over the mantle of longest-reigning winless team to their just defeated rivals — the Cleveland Indians haven't won a World Series since 1948.

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Ideas

Calmez-Vous, Americans: It's Quite OK To Call Us "The French"

A widely mocked tweet by the Associated Press tells its reporters to avoid dehumanizing labels such as "the poor" or "the French". But one French writer replies that the real dehumanizing threat is when open conversation becomes impossible.

Parisians sitting on a café terrasse.

Parisians sitting on a café terrasse.

Dirk Broddin on Flickr
Gaspard Koenig

-Essay-

PARIS — The largest U.S. news agency, the Associated Press (AP) tweeted a series of recommendations aimed at journalists: “We recommend avoiding general and often dehumanizing 'the' labels such as the poor, the mentally ill, the French, the disabled, the college-educated. Instead use, wording such as people with mental illnesses.”

The inclusion of “The French” in this list of groups likely to be offended has evoked well-deserved sarcasm. It finally gives me the opportunity to be part of a minority and to confirm at my own expense, while staying true to John Stuart Mill's conception of free speech: that offense is not a crime.

Offense should prompt quips, denial, mockery, and sometimes indifference. It engages conflict in the place where a civilized society accepts and cultivates it: in language.

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