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With her laid-back attitude, angelic face and Jasmine revolution experience, Deena Abdelwahed carves a perfect image of a modern, forward-looking Tunisia. She will also make you dance.

"I like to mix dance music that comes from the working classes. It is much more sincere. It appeals to everyone, not just the wealthy who can afford drinks in clubs," Abdelwahed said in an interview with Le Monde"s Nassira El Cherqui from Nefta in central Tunisia — on a break from the Dunes Electroniques festival where the 25-year-old DJ was playing.

Abdelwahed started as a singer but soon chose to turn to Electronic Dance Music (EDM) when she joined World Full Of Bass, a group of Tunisian DJs. She says being a woman in a predominantly male environment has not been particularly problematic: "I've always been treated as an equal, I've never encountered any reluctance or obstacles. On the contrary, I was helped and supported."

In January 2011, Abdelwahed actively took part in the Jasmine Revolution, which she considers a whole new starting point for the country. "Despite the fear that preoccupied us during the demonstrations, we were happy to finally be free and to be able to assert ourselves as individuals," she says.

As a DJ, Abdelwahed admits the revolution did not change much: "What did change is the youth's increasing need to go out and party. EMD is very successful today as it has become an excuse to blow off steam and vent the post-revolution frustration," she says.

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Migrant Lives

When Migrants Vanish: Families Quietly Endure Uncertainty

Zimbabweans cling to hope even after years of silence from loved ones who have disappeared across borders.

illustration of a woman in nature contemplating a framed picture of an older woman
Illustration by Matt Haney, GPJ

HARARE, ZIMBABWE — Blessing Tichagwa can barely remember her mother. Like hundreds of thousands of Zimbabweans, Noma Muyambo emigrated to South Africa in search of work, leaving baby Blessing, now 15, behind with her grandmother.

The last time they saw her was nine years ago, when Blessing was 6. Muyambo returned for one week, then left again — and has not sent any messages or money since.

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