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Look inside
Look inside
Laura Lin

BEIJING — It’s not something most of us have to worry about these days, but for some, having too much money can pose serious problems. Take, for example, your average corrupt Chinese official.

Former deputy director of Hohhot Railway Bureau in Inner Mongolia, Ma Junfei, was arrested, tried, sentenced to death and then reprieved for taking bribes totaling 130 million RMB ($21.5 million) in cash, and 40 kilograms of gold.

His biggest headache over the two-year trial? How to hide this much loot; it reportedly filled up two of his houses.

[rebelmouse-image 27087719 alt="""" original_size="500x206" expand=1]

The Epoch Times recently reported that within a mere 22 months of starting his mandate, Ma received, on average, 6 million RMB ($990,900) per month — almost $30,000 a day. He was too busy receiving all these bribes to even spend it, so his colossal pile remained pretty much untouched, a fact that helped him avoid the death penalty.

China’s booming economy over the past three decades has given unscrupulous officials seemingly unlimited opportunities at graft, though new Chinese leader Xi Jinping has made a crackdown on corruption one of his key objectives in office.

[rebelmouse-image 27087720 alt="""" original_size="500x274" expand=1]

Ma went to extreme, often creative, lengths to hide his embezzled funds, reports Beijing News, which also noted some of the other recent favorite places for other corrupt officials to stash their loot.

We've decided to rank them according to (a) creativity and, (b) the likelihood of it being found.

1. Under Piles Of Trash

Creative points: 1/10

Likelihood of being found: 10/10

[rebelmouse-image 27087721 alt="""" original_size="500x249" expand=1]

Sure, money may stink, but this is embezzlement at its sloppiest. Think a bit harder, folks.

2. Behind A Big Mirror

Creative points: 1/10

Likelihood of being found: 9/10

[rebelmouse-image 27087722 alt="""" original_size="380x214" expand=1]

Cops watch the same cop movies as the rest of us.

3. In A Rice Container

Creative points: 3/10

Likelihood of being found: 8/10

[rebelmouse-image 27087723 alt="""" original_size="245x195" expand=1]

Chinese cops watch the same Chinese cop movies as the rest of us.

4. In The Holes Of A Tree

Creative points: 4/10

Likelihood of being found: 8/10

[rebelmouse-image 27087724 alt="""" original_size="500x235" expand=1]

You play with Mother Nature, she may fly away with your bounty.

5. Under Roof Tiles

Creative points: 4/10

Likelihood of being found: 6/10

[rebelmouse-image 27087725 alt="""" original_size="245x138" expand=1]

This all depends on the handiwork of your tile guy.

6. In The Ceiling

Creative points: 5/10

Likelihood of being found: 5/10

[rebelmouse-image 27087726 alt="""" original_size="500x209" expand=1]

Ma clearly copied the idea from an NBA coach who hid $2,600 under ceiling tiles at the Staples Center in Los Angeles.

7. In Your Fish Pond

Creative points: 7/10

Likelihood of being found: 3/10

[rebelmouse-image 27087727 alt="""" original_size="229x129" expand=1]

Dirty money often sleeps with the fishes.

8. In The Lining Of Your Pants

Creative points: 8/10

Likelihood of being found: 3/10

[rebelmouse-image 27087728 alt="""" original_size="500x288" expand=1]

If I don’t jingle with coins I’ll be safe, you say? Wrong. Hu Fangyu, an official of Guizhou Province’s Changshun County, was discovered when his pants and their double lining were stolen by a thief, and later found by local police. He got sentenced to 11 years of wearing a prison jumpsuit.

9. In Your Sewage Tank

Creative points: 9/10

Likelihood of being found: 1/10

[rebelmouse-image 27087729 alt="""" original_size="500x255" expand=1]

Because, gross.

10. In The Mouths Of The Fish In Your Fish Pond

Creative points: 10/10

Likelihood of being found: 1/10

[rebelmouse-image 27087730 alt="""" original_size="404x257" expand=1]

Bonus points if your pond is stocked with piranha. (Coming Soon to theaters near you!)

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War In Ukraine, Day 279: New Kherson Horrors More Than Two Weeks After Russian Withdrawal

Shelling in Kherson

Anna Akage, Bertrand Hauger and Emma Albright

While retreating from Kherson, Russian troops forcibly removed more than 2,500 Ukrainians from prison colonies and pre-trial detention centers in the southern region. Those removed included prisoners as well as a large number of civilians who had been held in prisons during the occupation, according to the Ukrainian human rights organization Alliance of Ukrainian Unity.

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The NGO said it has evidence that these Ukrainians were first transferred to Crimea and then distributed to different prisons in Russia. During the transfer of the prisoners, Russian soldiers also reportedly stole valuables and food and mined the building of colony #61.

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