When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

URBAN TIMES, XINHUA (China), MING PAO (Hong Kong)

Worldcrunch

BEIJING – A top Chinese official announced on Monday that China would put an end to its controversial “Reeducation Through Labor” system.

According to the Urban Times, addressing a meeting in Beijing, new Political and Legal Affairs Committee head Meng Jianzhu, said: “the use of Reeducation Through Labor system will end this year, after approval from the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress.”

No further information on the reform is available, said Xinhua.

Established in 1955, Reeducation Through Labor camps allow Chinese police to detain people for up to four years without a trial. Created to “thoroughly wipe out counterrevolutionary elements in hiding,” there are over 350 labor camps in China.

According to the Bureau of Reeducation Through Labor, 160,000 people were being held in Chinese labor camps in 2008, reported Xinhua.

But as China’s economy opens up, this practice has come under intensified fire in recent years.

In 2011, Ren Jianyu, a 25-year-old village official from Chongqing was sentenced to two years of labor camp for forwarding “subversive content” on Sina Weibo – China’s Twitter-like microblogging site, sparking nationwide outrage. Last month, the Chongqing labor camp commission revoked this decision after months of public outcry, according to Hong Kong’s Ming Pao newspaper.

Since then, there have been many calls for the abolishment of the Reeducation Through Labor system. If it is confirmed, the end of this forced labor system would mark a clear sign that China's new leadership under Xi Jinping may indeed be intent on introducing major reforms.

[rebelmouse-image 27086029 alt="""" original_size="383x480" expand=1] Xi Jinping (wikipedia)

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

How South American Oceans Can Sway The U.S.-China Showdown

As global rivalries and over-fishing impact the seas around South America, countries there must find a common strategy to protect their maritime backyards.

RIMPAC 2022

Juan Gabriel Tokatlian

-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — As the U.S.-China rivalry gathers pace, oceans matter more than ever. This is evident just looking at the declarations and initiatives enacted concerning the Indian and Pacific oceans.

Yet there is very little debate in South America on the Sino-American confrontation and its impact on seas around South America, specifically the South-Eastern Pacific (SEP) and South-Western Atlantic (SWA). These have long ceased to be empty spaces — and their importance to the world's superpowers can only grow.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ