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Egypt

'We Are The Cogs' - An Imagined Memo To Egypt's New Interior Minister

Essay: A writer tries to imagine the mentality inside the Egyptian interior ministry, after a new crackdown has reasserted some control of the state's security apparatus. That protesters again paid the ultimate price may be of secondary concern i

Security forces in Cairo in December 2011 (Gigi Ibrahim)
Security forces in Cairo in December 2011 (Gigi Ibrahim)
Issandr El Amrani

CAIRO - With violence flaring again nearly a year after the Jan. 25 revolution began, an Egyptian writer pens an imaginary letter to the country's latest Interior Minister, courtesy of a would-be senior official inside the ministry. It is a portrayal of the sentiment within the security forces that may have led to recent bloodshed.

To: Mohamed Ibrahim, Interior Minister

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Geopolitics

Our 'Emotional' Divide: How The Ukraine War Reveals A World Broken In Two

Russia's invasion has created a stark global divide: them and us. On one side are the countries refusing to condemn Moscow, with the West on the other. It's a dangerous split that could have repercussions far into the future.

Protesters against the war in Ukraine demonstrate in front of the Russian embassy in London

Dominique Moïsi

-Analysis-

PARIS — "The West and the Rest of Us." That's the title of a 1975 essay written by Nigerian essayist and critic Chinweizu Ibekwe. I've been thinking about his words as the war in Ukraine both reveals and accelerates divisions of the world that I believe are ultimately "emotional" in nature.

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With war returning to Europe and the risk of escalation, there is a gap between the Western view and that of the "others," a distinct "us and them." This gap cannot be explained in strictly geographical, political, and economic terms.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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