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THE KOREA TIMES (South Korea), URIMINZOKKIRI (North Korea), AFP

Worldcrunch

North Korea, which is expected to carry out a third nuclear test any day now, has released a video depicting a city that resembles New York under missile attack.

The footage shows a dream sequence, set to the tune of Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie’s song "We Are The World." It features a young man picturing himself circling the globe on board a space shuttle.

The video gets real around the two-minute mark, when the camera zooms in to reveal what looks like New York City shrouded in a U.S. flag, its skyscrapers engulfed in flames after being hit by North Korean rockets.

The video was uploaded on Uriminzokkiri.com – a website that distributes news from North Korea's central news agency.

According to the AFP, the captions running across the screen read:

"Somewhere in the United States, black clouds of smoke are billowing"

"It seems that the nest of wickedness is ablaze with the fire started by itself"

The end of the video has the young man conclude that his dream will "surely come true"

The whole footage could be seen as just another provocation from a country known for its delusions of grandeur. But it coincides with a statement from South Korea's ambassador to the United Nations Kim Sook, warning that a North Korean nuclear test "seems to be imminent," The Korea Times reports.

The threat has led South Korea and the United States to warn North Korean leader Kim Jong-un of "further consequences," were the country to press on with a third nuclear test (North Korea carried two previous tests in 2006 and 2009).

Sanctions may most likely include a global freeze on Pyongyang’s international transactions and expanding the proliferation security initiative (PSI), a U.S.-led maritime interdiction of ships that are suspected of transporting banned materials, according to The Korea Times.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

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Under the Communist Party, each of the national republics also had their own government, albeit ultimately controlled by the Kremlin. Each of the republics, whether in Estonia, Georgia, Latvia, or Ukraine, had their own capital, culture, language and traditions. For each of the national republics, secession from the Soviet Union brought liberation and independence — an opportunity to build their own state. For every former member state, that is, except Russia.

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