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AMERICA ECONOMIA (Latin America), TERRA COLOMBIA (Colombia), EXCELSIOR (Mexico)

Worldcrunch

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez announced that his country would withdraw from the Inter-American Court of Human Rights "out of dignity," after the Costa-Rica based organization accused Venezuela of "inhumane" jail conditions, America Economia reports.

According to Terra Colombia, Hugo Chavez accused the Human Rights Court of supporting terrorism, after the commission issued a rule in favor of a man who had been sentenced to nine years in prison by the Venezuelan government. Raul Diaz had been found guilty of participating in the 2003 bombing attack on the Colombian consultate and Spanish Embassy in Caracas which injured four people.

Diaz managed to flee to the United States after serving out half of his sentence.

The Commission on Human Rights issued a rule against the Venezuelan government for alleged "inhuman and degrading treatment" during Diaz's detention.

The commission also ordered Venezuela to pay Raul Diaz's medical expenses as well as compensation for moral damages.

According to the Mexican daily Excelsior, Hugo Chavez called the ruling a "travesty," saying that it "offended the dignity of the Venezuelan people" and that his country had "no other solution" but to exit the organization.

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Geopolitics

The Xi-Putin Alliance Is Dead, Long Live The Xi-Putin Alliance

The façade of unity between Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin was lifted in Uzbekistan last week. But where exactly does the Chinese head of state stand on the Russian invasion of Ukraine? Beijing is still establishing its place in the world, and it remains in contradiction to the West

China's President Xi Jinping, Uzbekistan's President Shavkat Mirziyoyev and Russia's President Vladimir Putin during the 22nd Summit of the SCO

Gregor Schwung

-Analysis-

Xi Jinping is not out of practice. The Chinese President's public demeanor on his first foreign trip since January 2020 was as confident as ever. When meeting Russian President Vladimir Putin on the sidelines of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) summit in Samarkand, Uzbekistan, he promptly removed his mask and stood inches away from the Russian president, smiling affably.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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What looked routine to the outside world was a diplomatic tightrope walk that the Chinese leader felt compelled to perform. It was the first face-to-face meeting between the two leaders since February, when they proclaimed a "friendship without borders" at the Winter Olympics in Beijing. Shortly thereafter, Putin launched his campaign against Ukraine – and the world wondered whether Putin had used his Olympic visit to obtain Xi's approval for his invasion.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

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