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EL OBSERVADOR (Uruguay), LA NACION (Argentina)

Worldcrunch

MONTEVIDEO - Latin American diplomacy is buzzing after Uruguayan President José Mujica -- apparently unaware that his microphone was still on -- made nasty comments about his Argentinian counterpart, and her late husband.

At the end of an online broadcast about relations between Uruguay and surrounding countries, Mujica offered up some personal views on Argentinian President Cristina Kirchner and her husband, former President Nestor Kirchner, who died in 2010.

“That old bat is worse than the cross-eyed one,” he said to his colleague Carlos Enciso. “He was more political; she’s just stubborn.” Mujica also said that 77-year-old Argentinian-born Pope Francis was going to rein in Kirchner.

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Nestor and Cristina Kirchner in 2007. Photo by Presidencia de la Nación Argentina

El Observador writes that President Mujica had no idea that the microphones were still on, nor that his comments would be broadcast live from the web page of the President of the Republic.

Argentina's Foreign Ministry released a statement on Thursday, saying it was "profoundly upset" about the statement, especially from someone the President considered her friend.

Argentinian newspaper La Nación remembered that a similar episode happened with former Uruguayan President Jorge Batlle in 2002, when he said: “Argentinians are a bunch of thieves, from the first to the very last one of them”.

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War In Ukraine, Day 279: New Kherson Horrors More Than Two Weeks After Russian Withdrawal

Shelling in Kherson

Anna Akage, Bertrand Hauger and Emma Albright

While retreating from Kherson, Russian troops forcibly removed more than 2,500 Ukrainians from prison colonies and pre-trial detention centers in the southern region. Those removed included prisoners as well as a large number of civilians who had been held in prisons during the occupation, according to the Ukrainian human rights organization Alliance of Ukrainian Unity.

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The NGO said it has evidence that these Ukrainians were first transferred to Crimea and then distributed to different prisons in Russia. During the transfer of the prisoners, Russian soldiers also reportedly stole valuables and food and mined the building of colony #61.

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