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Geopolitics

Up To 30 Killed In South Africa When Train Slams Into Truck Full Of Farmworkers

MAIL & GUARDIAN (SOUTH AFRICA), AFP (FRANCE)

Worldcrunch

JOHANNESBURG - As many as 30 people were feared dead when a train collided with a farm truck in South Africa's northeastern province of Mpumalanga.

Andre Visser, a spokesperson for South African emergency services, told the Johannesburg daily Mail & Guardian that a coal train had collided with the large truck carrying as many as 50 farmworkers in a steel container similar to those used in shipping. The initial death toll was put at 19, with 24 injured, but Thulani Sibuyi, head of eastern Mpumalanga province's community service department told AFP that at least 30 people were killed in the incident.

"It would appear as if the truck driver may have crossed the railway line without having a proper look-out, and as a result the train hit him and then pulled him for about a kilometer to two kilometers," said Sibuyi. "The bodies are lying all over the scene, people torn apart."

The train driver was unharmed.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Saturate The East: Poland Revamps Its Military Strategy In Response To Russian Threat

Poland has a border with Russia and Belarus, so it is not just watching how the Ukraine war develops. Warsaw is rethinking its entire defense strategy.

Photo of a Polish soldier seen working at the construction of the fence along the border with the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad.

Wisztyniec, Poland. A Polish soldier seen working at the construction of the fence along the border with the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad.

Attila Husejnow / SOPA Images via ZUMA Press Wire
Stanislav Zhelikhovsky

KYIV — It will soon be exactly one year since the Russian Federation launched its large-scale invasion of Ukraine. During that time, neighboring Poland has been playing the role of a front-line country — NATO's eastern outpost.

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Polish government agencies have been hard at work on what to do if the country is attacked. In particular, a new defense directive. After all, Poland’s Political and Strategic Defense Directive, which has been in effect since 2018, must be updated because it simply doesn't match today's reality.

Poland's Deputy Minister of National Defense, Wojciech Skurkiewicz, announced a change in defense doctrine with the defense forces set up on the Vistula River, located in northeastern Poland. Ukraine's experience shows the need to protect the country's entire territory as quickly as possible.

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