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A pro-democracy protestor rests under an umbrella.
A pro-democracy protestor rests under an umbrella.

TURKEY EXPECTED TO JOIN ANTI-ISIS COALITION
Today could see the U.S.-led anti-ISIS coalition expand, as the Turkish Parliament is expected to vote on whether to send Turkish troops into Iraq and Syria to fight against the terrorists and whether to allow foreign troops to use Turkish military bases, newspaper Today’s Zaman reports. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is under growing pressure, as the jailed leader of the Kurdistan Workers' Party, Abdullah Ocalan, said that peace talks between his group and the Turkish government would end if Turkey lets ISIS “massacre” Kurds on the Syrian border town of Kobani. But Ankara’s recent support of anti-ISIS strikes and its possible participation in the coalition will raise questions because of previous reports that it helped arm, finance and treat ISIS fighters.

CHINA WARNS HONG KONG PROTESTERS
China has warned Hong Kong protesters of “unimaginable consequences” if they don’t end the “illegal” pro-democracy demonstrations that have brought a halt to the finance hub for five consecutive days, The Washington Post reports. In a similar move, the Hong Kong police said there would be serious consequences if protesters act on their threat to occupy government buildings unless Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying resigns by the end of the day. British journalist Ambrose Evans-Pritchard wrote in The Daily Telegraph that China’s Xi Jinping “will surely play for time, hoping the protests will fizzle ... or try to buy them off quietly” because yielding would likely encourage a similar movement on the mainland.

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Two Ukrainian soldiers at a military base on the outskirts of the separatist region of Donetsk

Lisa Berdet, Lila Paulou, Anne-Sophie Goninet and Bertrand Hauger

👋 Halito!*

Welcome to Wednesday, where the first war crimes trial against a Russian soldier since Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine gets underway in Kyiv, Kim Jong-un slams North Korean officials’ response to the coronavirus outbreak and Mexico’s National Registry of Missing People reaches a grim milestone. Meanwhile, Ukrainian news outlet Livy Bereg looks at the rise of ethnic separatism across Russia’s federal regions.

[*Choctaw, Native American]

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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