When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

Tripoli Voices: A Waiter, Doctor, Engineer, and Shopkeeper React To The Revolution

Amidst -- and beyond -- the rebel bombs and Gaddafi’s bunkers, the people of the Libyan capital finally feel free to speak out, and say what the upheaval means for them.

Lemine Ould Salem

TRIPOLI – It took us until early Wednesday morning to reach the capital. We had landed on the Tunisian resort island of Djerba the day before, and then traveled by car over the western mountains. At the Libyan border, members of the rebel army offered safe passage to Tripoli.

First stop: Green Square. It is a dangerous place to be, but it is the most symbolically important place in Tripoli for the revolutionaries, who were firing shots of joy into the air when we arrived. But our objective was another: to meet citizens across the Libyan capital to find out what the revolution, and especially the last few days, has meant to them. What do they expect from the future? With Muammar Gaddafi's four-decades-long regime crumbling, these are the voices of four Libyan men in the capital.

Keep reading... Show less
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

Fall Of The Empire? Ethnic Separatism On The Rise In Russia

Far from being a unified state, Russia is full of federal subjects — many of which have spawned separatist movements. Moscow, far from Siberia or the Caucasus and focused on Ukraine, is finding it harder to contain them.

Kalmyks attend the unveiling ceremony of a Buddha statue in Kalmykia, Russia

Pavel Lysyansky

They began to show up more and more in 2019: people were displaying symbols of separatism at protests in different regions of Russia. One example that marked this movement were the flags of the Ural People's Republic at protests during the spring of 2019 against the construction of a temple in Yekaterinburg, the industrial city in the Ural mountains 1,100 miles east of Moscow.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Keep reading... Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch Video Show less
MOST READ