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THE PRESS ASSOCIATION (UK), KHAAMA PRESS (Afghanistan), REUTERS

The UK Defense Ministry confirmed Monday that three British soldiers were shot to death at a check-point in southwest Afghanistan by a man wearing an Afghan police uniform. The gunman was injured and detained after the Sunday attack, a spokesperson for the Ministry told Reuters.

According to the UK Press Association, the soldiers were shot as they were leaving a shura, or meeting of elders, at checkpoint Kamparack Pul in Nahr-e-Saraj, in a southern stretch of Helmand Province. Two of the soldiers were from the 1st Battalion Welsh Guards and the other was from the Royal Corps of Signals. They were working with the Afghan Police Advisory Team.

In a statement on Sunday, the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) led by NATO had announced that "An individual wearing an Afghan National Civil Order Police uniform turned his weapon against ISAF service members in southern Afghanistan today, killing three service members," Khaama Press reports. Monday's report confirmed the nationalities of the victims.

Other so-called "green-on-blue" attacks by members of Afghan military or police forces against coalition soldiers had occured in May and March, a major blow to the morale of international troops that often work with and train locals.

According to BBC correspondent Quentin Sommerville in Kabul, the assailant could be a member of the Afghan National Civil Order Police, a special police force created in 2006 for law-enforcement.

The attack brings the total number of UK service member deaths to 422 since the begining of NATO operations in October 2001. There are currently 9,500 British troops in Afghanistan, with plans to bring them back by the end of 2014.

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Economy

Abenomics Revisited: Why Japan Hasn't Attacked The Wealth Divide

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida promised to tackle wealth inequality and help struggling workers. But a year after he came to power, financial traders are once again the winners.

Japanese workers will still have to wait for the distribution of wealth promised by Prime Minister Fumio Kishida.

Yann Rousseau

-Analysis-

TOKYO — Panic on the Nikkei, the Japanese stock market. Almost a year ago, at the end of September 2021, traders went into a panic in Tokyo. On Sept. 29, Fumio Kishida had just won the general election for the country's main conservative party, the Liberal Democratic Party. He was about to be named Prime Minister, succeeding Yoshide Suga, who'd grown too unpopular in the polls.

Kishida had won through a rather original reform program, which was in stark contrast with years of conservative pro-market politics. In his speeches, he had promised to generate a “new capitalism”. A phrase that makes investors shudder.

While he did not completely renounce his predecessors’ strategy called “Abenomics” — named after free-market stalwart Shinzo Abe, who was killed last July — Kishida declared that the government needed to tackle the issue of the redistribution of wealth in the island nation.

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