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Geopolitics

The Streets Of Paris: Who To Target, The Prostitute Or Pimp?

Prostitution is on the rise in Paris. The number of streetwalkers on the outer northern boulevards of the city has increased, as authorities debate so-called "passive solicitation," and look for new ways to crack down on the sex trade.

Paris' Pigalle Red Light District
Paris' Pigalle Red Light District
Anne Chemin

PARIS - They're sitting on a bench along one of the boulevards of northern Paris. Over-the-knee white boots, fur-collared coats, mini skirts: despite the cold, all three are waiting for a car to stop by the sidewalk. They chat while smoking cigarettes, taking advantage of a momentary lull in the traffic to relax, rolling their eyes when truck drivers honk at them. Gym regulars walk by in their sweatpants, people go shopping and a man looks at them and sighs: "They're already out on the prowl…"

It's 8pm, this March evening, and the first prostitutes have already taken their places on Boulevard Ney, in the 18th arrondissement in Northwest Paris. Here as elsewhere, street prostitution has increased so much in the past months that local Socialist party politicians called on the Paris City Council last December to reinforce initiatives aimed at helping woman caught up in prostitution, and to increase efforts to stamp out "pimping and the sexual exhibition it triggers on the street."

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Geopolitics

How Millennials And Boomers See Putin's Nuclear Threats Differently

Baby boomers who grew up under the threat of nuclear armageddon warn against a nuclear escalation of the war in Ukraine. But the younger generations are not cowed by Putin's blackmail. And that’s a very good thing.

Anti-nuclear bomb activists protest during Hiroshima Day Action in Amsterdam, Netherlands, in 2020.

Peter Huth

-Analysis-

BERLIN — It is a sentence that no German Chancellor had ever had to utter before. “I am doing everything I can to prevent an escalation that would lead to World War III. There must not be a nuclear war,” said Olaf Scholz.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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