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Russia

The Most Dangerous Job In Russia: Mayor

Another top official in a city north of Moscow was gunned down this week after he took on allegedly corrupt local forces. Some 40 top municipal officials have been targeted over the past decade.

Sergiyev Posad, a well-know tourist destination in Russia (akk_rus)
Sergiyev Posad, a well-know tourist destination in Russia (akk_rus)

Worldcrunch NEWS BITES

SERGIYEV POSAD -- In Russia, mayor has become a high-risk line of work. Over the past decade, more than 40 top city officials around the country have been either seriously injured or killed in targeted attacks. It happened again this week when Evgeny Dushko, mayor of a popular Russian tourist town, was shot dead in broad daylight in what investigators suspect was a contract killing.

Dushko, 35, was killed Monday on his way to a meeting to discuss a crisis over municipal services in Sergiyev Posad, a city 40 miles north of Moscow best known as the home of the Trinity Lavra, a 14th century Russian Orthodox monastery.

Prior to his death, Dushko had aired corruption allegations against local officials. He had a tense relationship with local companies and his father said local officials may have been involved. Police say his death was likely to be connected to his job.

Since 2000, at least 40 mayors or deputy mayors in Russia have been targeted.

Leaving his father's house, Dushko was in his Volvo S60 when an unknown assailant fired at him seven times on the driver's side, before fleeing.

When he heard the gunfire, Dushko's father raced out of the house and saw his son bleeding. His father rushed him to hospital but two bullet wounds to the chest proved to be fatal. His wife and children were overseas on holiday at the time.

Evgeny Dushko, who served as the chairman of the city council, was elected head of the town on April 7.

His father claimed local officials and businessmen may have been involved in the killing and his son had received threats and made repeated pleas for protection after rising tensions over public utilities policy.

Two months ago, Dushko had set up a municipal state company that would handle the transfer of management of city utilities, property and construction. This created conflict with a local management company called Posad Energo, which controls most of the local contracts. Dushko had accused the company of fraud. At the same time, some businessmen and companies had accused Dushko of abuse of power.

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev recently said corruption remained rampant at a municipal level.

Read the full story in Russian by Yuri Senatorov

Photo - akk_rus

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Geopolitics

The Paradox Of Putin's War: Europe Is Going To Get Bigger, And Move Eastward

The European Union accelerated Ukraine's bid to join the Union. But there are growing signs, it won't stop there.

European Parliament in Strasbourg

Valon Murtezaj

-Analysis-

PARIS — Russia’s war of aggression against Ukraine has upended the European order as we know it, and that was even before the Nord Stream 1 gas pipeline was cut off earlier this month. While the bloc gets down to grappling with the unfolding energy crisis, the question of consolidating its flanks by speeding up the enlargement process has also come back into focus.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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In a critical meeting on June 23-24, the European Сouncil granted candidate status to Ukraine and Moldova and recognized the “European perspective” of Georgia – a nod acknowledging the country’s future belonged within the European Union.

Less than a month later, Brussels brought to an end the respectively 8- and 17-year-long waits for Albania and North Macedonia by allowing them into the foray of accession negotiations.

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