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Asylum-seeking migrants try to cross the Rio Grande river, at the border between Mexico and the United States.
Asylum-seeking migrants try to cross the Rio Grande river, at the border between Mexico and the United States.

Welcome to Thursday, where Washington calls for suspension of COVID vaccine patents, Philippines President regrets getting a Chinese jab and Europe's biggest bear is dead. Germany daily Die Welt, meanwhile, looks at the perils of cops who want to be internet famous.

• U.S. to support vaccine patent waiver: The Biden administration has come out in support of suspending intellectual property protections for COVID-19 vaccines, backing international efforts to speed up production, especially in developing countries.

• Colombian president calls for dialogue: Colombian President Ivan Duque has called for national dialogue after days of protests that led to at least 24 deaths and concern about police violence.

• Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Wong sentenced: Hong Kong's best-known pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong has been sentenced to ten months in jail for participating in an unauthorised march marking the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown.

• UK Navy ships patrol near Jersey over fishing tension with France: Two Royal Navy ships are patrolling around the British island of Jersey as French fishermen protest post-Brexit fishing rules. France has also threatened to cut off electricity to the island.

• Facebook maintains Trump ban (for now): Facebook's oversight board has upheld former U.S President Donald Trump's removal from Facebook, but gave the company six months to give a permanent response. Trump was banned from Facebook and Twitter last January following the Capitol attack by his supporters.

• Safe landing for SpaceX: SpaceX's Starship rocket prototype achieved its first clean landing, after four previous attempts ended up in explosions. NASA has recently chosen this prototype to land astronauts on the Moon in the coming years.

• Royal blamed for killing Europe's largest bear: Preservationists suspect a Liechtenstein prince of having shot dead the biggest bear alive in Europe as part of a hunting expedition in Romania last March.

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Geopolitics

NATO Entry For Sweden And Finland? Erdogan May Not Be Bluffing

When the two Nordic countries confirmed their intention to join NATO this week, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan repeated his plans to block the application. Accusing Sweden and Finland of' "harboring" some of his worst enemies may not allow room for him to climb down.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared opposition to Finland and Sweden entering NATO

Meike Eijsberg

-Analysis-

LONDON — When Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared his opposition to Finland and Sweden entering NATO, it took most of the West's top diplomatic experts by surprise — with the focus squarely on how Russia would react to having two new NATO members in the neighborhood. (So far, that's been a surprise too)

But now Western oversight on Turkey's stance has morphed into a belief in some quarters that Erdogan is just bluffing, trying to get concessions from the negotiations over such a key geopolitical issue.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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To be clear, any prospective NATO member requires the consent of all 30 member states and their parliaments. So Erdogan does indeed have a card to play, which is amplified by the sense of urgency: NATO, Sweden and Finland are keen to complete the accession process with the war in Ukraine raging and the prospect of strengthening the military alliance's position around the Baltic Sea.

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