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The skies above Beijing turn a dark yellow as China’s capital city is hit by a third major sandstorm in five weeks.
The skies above Beijing turn a dark yellow as China’s capital city is hit by a third major sandstorm in five weeks.

Welcome to Friday, where a mass shooting in Indianapolis leaves eight dead, Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai is sentenced and a Danish photographer's image from Brazil wins World Press Photo of the Year. Independent media Kayhan-London also exposes how the suspected sabotage at the Natanz nuclear facility in Iran has done more than physical harm for the regime.

Hong Kong's Jimmy Lai sentenced: Two of Hong Kong's best-known activists were sentenced today for their participation in unauthorized assemblies during the 2019 mass pro-democracy protests. Media tycoon Jimmy Lai was sentenced to 12 months in prison, as democratic activist Martin Lee avoided prison because of his advanced age, and was given a suspended sentence of 11 months.

China's economy grows by a record 18.3%: China's economy grew 18.3% in a post-COVID comeback, setting a record in gross domestic product (GDP) since China started keeping quarterly records in 1992.

Eight shot dead in Indianapolis: At least eight people were killed in a mass shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis Thursday night, with multiple injuries reported, before the gunman killed himself. Last week, six people were killed in another mass shooting, in South Carolina.

Brazil's Supreme Court clears path for Lula to take on Bolsonaro: The Brazilian Supreme Court has confirmed its decision to annul convictions against former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who was accused of corruption. This sets up a likely head-to-head with conservative President Jair Bolsonaro in the 2022 elections.

Argentina closes schools as COVID-19 surges: Argentina's government has announced new pandemic restrictions to curb the spread of the virus in and around capital city Buenos Aires, including shutting down schools and a night-time curfew.

"Sexual slavery" in Tigray: New revelations of rape and a declaration by a top Ethiopia health official has pointed to widespread sexual abuse in the conflict in the northern region of Tigray. Both sides are said to have committed war crimes, including sexual violence. Hundreds other women have reported rape.

Mystery animal turns out to be a croissant: Multiple residents in a neighborhood in Krakow, Poland called animal welfare workers after having spotted an unusual animal sitting in a tree for several days, fearing attack. An investigation revealed that the creature in the tree was actually a croissant.

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Ideas

García Márquez And Truth: How Journalism Fed The Novelist's Fantasy

In his early journalistic writings, the Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez showed he had an eye for factual details, in which he found the absurdity and 'magic' that would in time be the stuff and style of his fiction.

Colombian novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez reads his book

J. D. Torres Duarte

BOGOTÁ — In short stories written in the 1940s and early 50s and later compiled in Eyes of a Blue Dog, the late Gabriel García Márquez, Colombia's Nobel Prize-winning novelist, shows he is as yet a young writer, with a style and subjects that can be atypical.

Stylistically, García Márquez came into his own in the celebrated One Hundred Years of Solitude. Until then both his style and substance took an erratic course: touching the brevity of film scripts in Nobody Writes to the Colonel, technical experimentation in Leaf Storm, the anecdotal short novel in In Evil Hour or exploring politics in Big Mama's Funeral. Throughout, the skills he displayed were rather of a precocious juggler.

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