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Protesters carry a wounded man after police and military opened fire on the crowd, killing 18, during the military coup demonstrations in Yangon, Myanmar.
Protesters carry a wounded man after police and military opened fire on the crowd, killing 18, during the military coup demonstrations in Yangon, Myanmar.

Welcome to Monday, where Aung San Suu Kyi is seen after Myanmar death count spikes, vaccine rollouts begin across Africa and there's a cool new way to make old photos come to life. We also feature Argentine daily Clarin"s look into the digital phenomenon of "sugar dating."

• COVID-19 latest: Ivory Coast began their national rollout of the COVID vaccine using COVAX, while Ghana & Nigeria are due to start this week. Distribution of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine begins today in the U.S.

• Myanmar coup: Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi was seen for the first time today since being detained in a video of her court hearing. This followed the worst day of violence Sunday when police opened fire killing 18 protesters, according to the UN human rights office.

• Netanyahu accusations: Israel's Prime Minister Netanyahu blamed Iran for the destruction of an Israeli-owned cargo ship in the Gulf of Oman last week.

• Hong Kong charges 47: Police in Hong Kong have charged 47 pro-democracy activists with "subversion", in the widest use yet of the territory's controversial security law.

• Navalny moved to penal colony: Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was transferred from Moscow to a penal colony about 100km (60 miles) east of the capital to begin his sentence.

• Trump speech: Former U.S. President Donald Trump made his first public appearance since leaving the White House, slamming his successor, repeating lies that he won the last race and hinting that he may run again in 2024.

• Cool or creepy?: Artificial intelligence is powering a new digital tool to animate photographs that can bring your old relatives back to life.

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Society

Urban Indigenous: How Peru's Shipibo-Conibo Keep Amazon Culture Alive In The City

For four years, indigenous photographer David Díaz Gonzales has documented the lives and movements of his Shipibo-Conibo community, as many of them migrated from their native Peruvian Amazon to the city. A work of remembrance and resistance.

For Shipibo-Conibo women, sporting a fringe is usually a sign of celebration or ceremony.

Rosa Chávez Yacila

YARINACOCHA — It was decades ago when the Shipibo-Conibo left their settlements along the banks of the Ucayali River, in eastern Peru, to begin a great migration to the cities. Still among the largest Amazonian communities in Peru — 32,964 according to the Ministry of Culture — though most Shipibo-Conibo now live in the urban district of Yarinacocha.

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