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Neighbors look at rumble of a 12-story Miami building after its partial collapse
Neighbors look at rumble of a 12-story Miami building after its partial collapse

Welcome to Friday, where dozens are still missing in the Florida building collapse, Dutch and Hungarian prime ministers clash, and tourists are confused about Mexico City. We also turn to Les Echos for an analysis of the Sudan-Egypt tensions generated by Ethiopia's Great Renaissance Dam.

• Dozens missing after Florida building collapse: A 12-story oceanfront residential building collapsed in Surfside, near Miami, Florida, killing at least three people. Rescue missions are underway to find survivors in the rubble, with an estimated 99 people still missing, many of whom are Latin American migrants.

• Belarus journalist Roman Protasevich moved to house arrest: The 26-year-old Belarusian dissident who was captured from a Ryanair jet on May 23 has now been moved to house arrest, alongside with his girlfriend, a Russian citizen. Protasevich was charged with organising mass unrest, and could face up to 15 years in prison. Belarus fighter jets forced the plane Protasevich was on to land in Minsk.

• Chauvin to be sentenced for George Floyd murder: Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis policeman, will be sentenced today for murdering George Floyd in May 2020, with prosecutors seeking a 30-year sentence. The other three police officers involved in Floyd's death will be facing trial next year with the charge of "aiding and abetting murder."

• Outrage after Pakistan prime minister blames rape crisis on women: Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan is facing criticism after blaming rape victims for wearing "very few clothes." Khan was questioned about the "ongoing rape epidemic" in Pakistan, where most women wear conservative national clothings. Various women's rights groups in the country demanded Khan apologize for a statement that "reinforces the perception that women are ‘knowing" victims and men ‘helpless' aggressors."

• Deadly tornado in Czech Republic: A tornado moving 218 km/h swept across several villages in southeastern Czech, killing four and injuring more than 100 more.

• COVID update: After a rise in COVID cases likely due to the Delta variant, the Israeli health ministry reimposed indoor mask requirement in public places. The country has witnessed four days of more than 100 daily new cases. In Australia, where low rates of COVID transmission has been maintained, Sydney, the country's biggest city, goes into its first lockdown since December, after a cluster of 65 cases.

• Shark bites man (3,000 years ago): Oxford researchers have found the earliest evidence of a shark attack on a human, on a 3,000 year-old-skeleton discovered in Japan that bears no fewer than 790 shark teeth marks.

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Geopolitics

Is Soft Power Dead?

With an activist Supreme Court creating a gap between democratic rhetoric and reality in the U.S., and Russia and China eager to flex military muscle, the full-force return to hard power looks bound for dominance.

U.S. flag and Chinese flag

Dominique Moïsi

-Analysis-

PARIS — Russia's war in Ukraine rages on, tensions are erupting in the South China Sea and now abortion rights are being stripped away in the U.S.: Looking around the world, we have to ask: what is left of the notion of soft power?

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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How can we talk about the power to convince when the power to coerce is increasingly the norm? And when there is such a gap between rhetoric and reality in the U.S. and in Russia and China, hard power almost seems to have become part of soft power?

“We will lead the world not by the example of our power, but by the power of our example,” Joe Biden said the day after his election. But what kind of example was he talking about? That of the Supreme Court’s judges, whose decision promises a terrible future to women and to all those who still wanted to believe in an enlightened and liberal America?

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

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