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Protester in Beirut, Lebanon, on March 8
Protester in Beirut, Lebanon, on March 8

Welcome to Tuesday, where Italy surpasses 100,000 coronavirus deaths, Lula is cleared of corruption charges, and the trial of the former police officer accused of murdering George Floyd starts. We also look at how the pandemic has impacted fertility rates in developed countries.

• COVID-19 latest: Italy passes 100,000 deaths mark, as it announces it will be the first EU country to start producing Russia's Sputnik V vaccine. Meanwhile, Latin America hits 700,000 fatalities, and the U.S. records less than 1,000 daily deaths for the first time in months, as the country's $1.9 trillion recovery bill is on the brink of becoming law.

• Myanmar coup: Three people were killed yesterday, as police used tear gas, sound grenades and rubber bullets to quell protests. Thousands defied curfew to demand the release of protesters held by security forces.

• Equatorial Guinea explosion update: The death toll from Sunday's explosions at a military compound has risen to 98, with another 615 injured. Spain has pledged to send humanitarian aid to the former Spanish colony.

• George Floyd murder trial: The trial of Derek Chauvin, the former Minnesota police officer accused of killing George Floyd, is set to begin.

• Judge annuls Lula's convictions: A Supreme Court judge has annulled Brazilian ex-President Luiz Inácio "Lula" da Silva's conviction in a corruption scandal, opening the door to a possible run for president next year.

• Royal Wall of Silence: The tell-all interview with Oprah Winfrey in which the Duke and Duchess of Sussex discuss racism within the royal family has been met with silence from Buckingham palace.

• "Major" incident: U.S. President Joe Biden's two dogs were sent back from Washington to the Biden family home in Delaware after Major, a 3-year-old German Shepherd, was involved in a "biting incident" with a member of White House security.

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Geopolitics

How Millennials And Boomers See Putin's Nuclear Threats Differently

Baby boomers who grew up under the threat of nuclear armageddon warn against a nuclear escalation of the war in Ukraine. But the younger generations are not cowed by Putin's blackmail. And that’s a very good thing.

Anti-nuclear bomb activists protest during Hiroshima Day Action in Amsterdam, Netherlands, in 2020.

Peter Huth

-Analysis-

BERLIN — It is a sentence that no German Chancellor had ever had to utter before. “I am doing everything I can to prevent an escalation that would lead to World War III. There must not be a nuclear war,” said Olaf Scholz.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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