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A Nepalese police officer douses burning effigy of PM during a protest in Kathmandu
A Nepalese police officer douses burning effigy of PM during a protest in Kathmandu

Welcome to Friday, where new proof is revealed of China's long-range missile silos, India surpasses 400,000 COVID deaths, and we meet the youngest chess grandmaster ever. El Espectador also looks at how the popular Hass avocado is threatening Colombia's ecosystems and causing water shortages in areas once dominated by coffee bean cultivation.

• China is building a sprawling network of missile silos: According to satellite imagery, China appears to be building a network of what appear to be intercontinental ballistic missile silos in its western desert. The field comprises 120 silos that could potentially house weapons capable of reaching the U.S. mainland, a finding that analysts argue could change the equation for U.S. military planners in Asia.

• U.S. forces leave main Bagram base in Afghanistan: After nearly 20 years, American troops have pulled out of their main military base in Afghanistan, under an agreement with the Taliban. Friday's withdrawal is the clearest indication that the last of the 2,500+ U.S. troops have left or are nearing departure, months ahead of President Biden's promise that they would be gone by September 11.

• No impeachment for Bolsonaro: The Brazilian lower house will not take up the corruption claims raised by a senate probe into the handling of vaccine procurement, which had renewed calls for impeachment of President Jair Bolsonaro.

• COVID update: India has surpassed 400,000 deaths, while the country tries to speed up its vaccination drive. Experts say the real number of fatalities could be much higher. The Johnson & Johnson single shot vaccine shows a strong response against the Delta variant as well as other emerging strains. The Delta variant, responsible for most coronavirus infections in the UK, appears to not be driving a surge in the rate of hospital admissions. This data suggests that countries with high vaccination rates are unlikely to see major surges in hospitalizations from the fast-spreading variant.

• Boy Scouts of America to pay $850 million sex abuse settlement: In what is slated to be the largest sexual abuse settlement in U.S. history, the Boy Scouts of America will pay out an $850 million settlement to victims of sexual abuse while taking part in their organization. More than 60,000 people have come forward with claims, many of which were never reported to law enforcement.

• New evacuations ordered amid wildfire and heatwave in Canada: Lytton, the Western Canadian town that this week recorded the country's highest ever temperature of 49.6C (121.3F), evacuated more than 1,000 people before a fast-moving wildfire "engulfed the town within minutes." The parliamentary representative for Lytton's district wrote that 90% of the town is burned. The heat wave continues to wreak havoc throughout Canada's west coast.

• Bezos gives 82-year-old woman second chance to go to space: Wally Funk, an 82-year-old aerospace engineer who trained to go to space in 1961, but was denied due to her gender, will be Jeff Bezos' "honored guest" in his upcoming space flight. Funk was part of the Mercury 13 program which sought to train female astronauts, but was later cancelled, as only male military test pilots were permitted to become astronauts at the time.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Hide-And-Seek Of Drone Warfare, A Letter From Ukraine's Front Line

A member of the Ukrainian Armed Forces writes his account of the new dynamic of targeting, and being targeted by, the invading Russian troops, as drones circle above and trenches get left behind.

A Ukrainian military drone operator during a testing of anti-drone rifle in Kyiv.

Igor Lutsenko*

KYIV — The current war in Ukraine is a game of hide-and-seek. Both sides are very well-stocked with artillery, enough to destroy the enemy along many kilometers. Swarms of drones fly through the air day and night, keeping a close eye on the earth's surface below. If they notice something interesting, it immediately becomes a target. Depending on the priority, they put it in line for destruction by artillery.

Therefore, the only effective way to survive is to hide, or at least somehow prove to the drones your non-priority status — and avoid moving to the front of the 'queue of death.'

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In general, the nature of this queue is a particular thing. It may seem to be a god, but is instead a simple artillery captain's decision of when to have lunch, and when to fire on the house where several enemy soldiers are staying. It's just a handful of ordinary people (observers, artillerymen) deciding how long their enemies will live depending on their own schedule or the weather, the availability of ammunition or if they're feeling tired.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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