When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Winner Novak Djokovic of Serbia kisses trophy after the final match of the French Open
Winner Novak Djokovic of Serbia kisses trophy after the final match of the French Open

Welcome to Monday, where Israel gets a new Prime Minister after Netanyahu's 12-year tenure, more good news from another COVID-19 vaccine and a houseplant breaks a record in New Zealand. Ukrainian news website Livy Bereg also explains what's at stake for Ukraine as Joe Biden meets with Vladimir Putin in Geneva later this week.

• Benjamin Netanyahu's 12-year run as Israel prime minister ends: On Sunday, the Israeli parliament approved a new government led by nationalist Naftali Bennett. The change, brought out by a narrow 60-59 vote, marks an end of an era.

• Erdogan and Biden to have a NATO meeting: Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan said he and U.S. President Joe Biden must use their bilateral meeting to discuss past troubles, such as Ankara's purchase of Russian missiles. Erdogan has reportedly been frustrated by the more critical approach from the new U.S. Administration.

• COVID update: In its 29,960-person trial, small U.S. company Novavax found that a two-shot inoculation demonstrated an overall efficacy of 90.4 percent. Despite these impressive results, the vaccine's future in the U.S. is uncertain and might be needed more in other countries. Meanwhile, India has recorded 70,421 new daily COVID-19 cases, the lowest since the end of March. The country, one of the hardest hit by COVID-19, also saw 3,936 deaths in the same period.

• Five more opposition figures detained in Nicaragua: Several of President Daniel Ortega's former allies were arrested on Sunday, accused of inciting foreign interference in Nicaragua's affairs. About 12 opposition figures have been arrested in recent days.

• Huge gas explosion in central China kills at least 12: The blast took place at about 6:30 a.m. local time in the Zhangwan district of Shiyan city, in Hubei province. The cause of the accident is still under investigation.

• Djokovic and Krejčíková win French Open: World no.1 Novak Djokovic from Serbia beat Greece's Stefanos Tsitsipas to win his 19th Slam title in a five-set thriller at Roland Garros. The Czech Republic's Barbora Krejčíková became the first woman in 21 years to win both the singles and doubles title.

• D-Day watch starts working again after 77 years: American veteran Raymond Geddes' watch was broken during D-Day operations on June 6, 1944. It was on display in the Dead Man's Corner Museum and started ticking again on June 10.

Keep reading... Show less
Badge
REUTERS
Reuters is an international news agency headquartered in London, UK. It was founded in 1851 and is now a division of Thomson Reuters. It transmits news in English, French, Arabic, Spanish, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Japanese, Korean, Urdu, and Chinese.
Badge
CNN
CNN (Cable News Network) is a multinational news organization and TV channel. Headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, it is part of the Warner Media group and was founded in 1980 by Ted Turner and Reese Schonfeld.
Badge
THE NEW YORK TIMES
The New York Times (sometimes abbreviated to NYT) is an American daily newspaper, founded and continuously published in New York City since 1851. It has won 117 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other news organization. Its daily circulation is estimated to 1,380,000.
Badge
THE INDIAN EXPRESS
The Indian Express, founded in 1931 is the great rival of one of the country's other English-language dailies, the Times of India. Renowned for its political and financial investigations, The Indian Express has received several journalism and press photo awards. In 1991, the Indian Express Group was split between family members, resulting in southern editions being rebranded The New Indian Express.
Badge
BBC
The BBC is the British public service broadcaster, and the world's oldest national broadcasting organization. It broadcasts in up to 28 different languages.
Badge
THE GUARDIAN
Founded as a local Manchester newspaper in 1821, The Guardian has gone on to become one of the most influential dailies in Britain. The left-leaning newspaper is most recently known for its coverage of the Edward Snowden leaks.
Badge
WORLDCRUNCH
Premium stories from Worldcrunch's own network of multi-lingual journalists in over 30 countries.
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

AMLO Power Grab: Mexico's Electoral Reform Would Make Machiavelli Proud

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, aka AMLO, says his plans to reform the electoral system are a way to save taxpayer money. A closer look tells a different story.

President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador of Mexico votes

Luis Rubio

OpEd-

MEXICO CITY — For supporters of Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) the goal is clear: to keep power beyond the 2024 general election, at any price. Finally, the engineers of the much-touted Fourth Transformation, ALMO's 2018 campaign promise to do away with the privileged abuses that have plagued Mexican politics for decades, are showing their colors.

Current electoral laws date back to the 1990s, when unending electoral disputes were a constant of every voting round and impeded effective governance in numerous states and districts. The National Electoral Institute (INE) and its predecessor, the IFE, were created to solve once and for all those endemic disputes.

Their promoters hoped Mexico could expect a more honest future, with the electoral question resolved. The 2006 presidential elections, which included AMLO as a recalcitrant loser, showed this was hoping for too much. That election is also, remotely, at the source of the president's new electoral initiative.

Keep reading... Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch Video Show less
MOST READ