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Memorial at the Gold Spa, one of the three Atlanta massage parlors targeted in this week’s shootings.
Memorial at the Gold Spa, one of the three Atlanta massage parlors targeted in this week’s shootings.

Welcome to Thursday, where Tanzania tries to understand if its president died of COVID, Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi faces new charges and we discover what life on Mars *sounds* like. We also tune in to Le Monde to see how the invitation-only audio-chat app Clubhouse is seen as trouble by Arab regimes.

Death of Tanzania President: COVID-skeptic President John Magufuli, 61, of Tanzania has died from heart failure, after weeks of speculations that he had COVID.

• N. Korea dismisses U.S. offer for nuclear talks: North Korea has issued a statement saying it has no intentions of having a discussion with the U.S.

• Tokyo Olympics official quits (again!): Olympic creative head Hiroshi Sasaki has resigned after suggesting to dress popular female Japanese entertainer Naomi Watanabe as an "Olympig" during the opening ceremony. This follows the resignation of the Games president Yoshiro Mori last month over sexist remarks when he said women talk too much.

• Atlanta shootings update: 21-year-old Robert Long has confessed to the three massage parlor shootings, telling officials about a "temptation for him that he wanted to eliminate," in self-diagnosed as a sex-addiction.

• Myanmar's ousted leader faces new charges: The Myanmar junta has charged Aung San Suu Kyi with accepting bribe money from a businessman.

• Mars rover sends back noises: NASA's Perseverance has sent back the first-ever sounds recorded on the planet Mars, in a sixteen minute audio clip.

• Library book returned after 63 years: A woman, 74, returned a copy of Ol" Paul, the Mighty Logger to the Queens Public Library in New York, which she checked out as a child, 63 years earlier. She also accompanied the return with a $500 donation to cover the late fees.

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Ideas

García Márquez And Truth: How Journalism Fed The Novelist's Fantasy

In his early journalistic writings, the Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez showed he had an eye for factual details, in which he found the absurdity and 'magic' that would in time be the stuff and style of his fiction.

Colombian novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez reads his book

J. D. Torres Duarte

BOGOTÁ — In short stories written in the 1940s and early 50s and later compiled in Eyes of a Blue Dog, the late Gabriel García Márquez, Colombia's Nobel Prize-winning novelist, shows he is as yet a young writer, with a style and subjects that can be atypical.

Stylistically, García Márquez came into his own in the celebrated One Hundred Years of Solitude. Until then both his style and substance took an erratic course: touching the brevity of film scripts in Nobody Writes to the Colonel, technical experimentation in Leaf Storm, the anecdotal short novel in In Evil Hour or exploring politics in Big Mama's Funeral. Throughout, the skills he displayed were rather of a precocious juggler.

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