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Thousands of coal mining and power workers protested in Warsaw, Poland, against a European Union court order to immediately close down a mine, and Europe’s gradual phasing out of coal extraction and use, which they say will eliminate hundreds of thousands
Thousands of coal mining and power workers protested in Warsaw, Poland, against a European Union court order to immediately close down a mine, and Europe’s gradual phasing out of coal extraction and use, which they say will eliminate hundreds of thousands

Welcome to Thursday, where President Biden has begun his first foreign trip, Aung San Suu Kyi faces new corruption charges and a South African woman gives birth to what may be a record number of babies. We also scrutinize how facial recognition is being used around the world, not just as a surveillance tool.

• Biden arrives in Europe: U.S. President Joe Biden has begun his first foreign trip as President, after his late-night arrival in the UK. Biden will attend the G7 summit in Cornwall, visit NATO in Brussels and have a much anticipated meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Geneva.

• New charges against Aung San Suu Kyi: The deposed leader of Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi, and other former officials from her government, are accused of a range of corruption charges, adding to previous accusations by the military regime that overthrew the democratically elected government in a February 1 coup that has plunged the country into chaos.

• Biden revokes TikTok and WeChat bans: After the Trump administration had attempted to block new users from downloading the Chinese-owned apps, TikTok and WeChat, President Joe Biden has withdrawn these executive orders but has ordered a review of the security concerns.

• Russian court outlaws groups linked to opposition leader Navalny: The Moscow ruling has labeled Alexei Navalny's organizations as extremist, preventing people associated with them from seeking public office and carrying lengthy prison sentences for anyone who donates to them.

• El Salvador became the first country to make Bitcoin legal currency: Congress approved President Nayib Bukele's proposal, with 62 out of 84 possible votes. According to the President, the cryptocurrency will make it easier for Salvadorians living abroad to send money home.

• EU COVID passport gets final green light: The European Parliament has approved COVID vaccine certificates intended to recover restriction-free travel within the bloc. The agreement also obliges the Member States from refraining to impose additional entry restrictions, like quarantine or more testing.

• South African woman gives birth to 10 babies: Gosiame Thamara Sithole became a mother of seven boys and three girls. Mother and children are in good health, while the Guinness World Records investigates the case.

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Society

Taking A Position: A Call To Regulate Yoga In India

Trained practitioners warn that unregulated yoga can be detrimental to people's health. The government in India, where the ancient practice was invented, knows this very well — yet continues to postpone regulation.

Prime Minister Modi at a mass yoga demonstration in Lucknow, India

Banjot Kaur

NEW DELHI — Prime Minister Narendra Modi led the observance of the eighth International Yoga Day from Mysuru, in southwestern India, early on the morning of June 21. Together with his colleagues from the Bharatiya Janata Party, he set out to mark the occasion in various parts of the country — reviving an annual ritual that had to take a break for the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Yoga is one of the five kinds of alternative Indian medicine listed under India’s AYUSH efforts — standing for "Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha and naturopathy, and Homeopathy." Among them, only yoga is yet to be regulated under any Act of Parliament: All other practices are governed by the National Commission for Indian System of Medicine (NCISM), Act 2020.

Yoga and naturopathy are taught at the undergraduate level in 70 medical colleges across 14 Indian states. The Mangalore University in Karnataka first launched this course in 1989; today, these subjects are also taught at the postgraduate level.

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