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REUTERS, SKY NEWS,BBC (UK), AL JAZEERA (UAE)

Worldcrunch

Sectarian violence in Lebanon escalated Tuesday night, claiming at least 10 lives, Reuters reports, as the Syrian crisis spills over to its neighbors.

Old tensions between Sunni Muslims and Alawites in Lebanon's second city Tripoli have flared up due to the continuing Syrian conflict, which has seen Bashar al-Assad's Alawite minority clash with the mainly Sunni opposition.

The Lebanese government is attempting to quell the violence between the Sunni district of Bab al-Tabbaneh and the neighboring Alawite district Jebel Mohsen.

The BBC reported that Lebanese Prime Minister Najib Mikati, a Sunni, urged citizens "not to allow anyone to transform you into ammunition for someone else's war."

Referring to the Syrian crisis, he said: "We have repeatedly warned against being drawn into this blaze that has spread around Lebanon."

Over 100 people have been wounded since violence erupted Monday night. According to Reuters, rocket-fuelled grenades shook the city in the small hours of Wednesday morning.

Al Jazeera reports that a Lebanese Shia clan last week kidnapped at least 23 Sunni Muslims and a Turkish businessman in retaliation to the Free Syrian Army's kidnapping of one of the clansmen.

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Geopolitics

Women, Life, Freedom: Iranian Protesters Find Their Voice

In the aftermath of the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini, who was arrested by the morality police mid-September for not wearing her hijab properly, many Iranians have taken the streets in nationwide protests. Independent Egyptian media Mada Masr spoke to one of the protesters.

Students of Amirkabir University in Tehran protest against the Islamic Republic in September 2022.

Lina Attalah

On September 16, protests erupted across Iran when 22-year-old Mahsa Amini died in custody after being arrested and beaten by morality police for her supposedly unsuitable attire. The protests, witnesses recount, have touched on all aspects of rights in Iran, civil, political, personal, social and economic.

Mada Masr spoke to a protester who was in the prime of her youth during the 2009 Green Movement protests. Speaking on condition of anonymity due to possible security retaliation, she walked us through what she has seen over the past week in the heart of Tehran, and how she sees the legacy of resistance street politics in Iran across history.

MADA MASR: Describe to us what you are seeing these days on the streets of Tehran.

ANONYMOUS PROTESTER: People like me, we are emotional because we remember 2009. The location of the protests is the same: Keshavarz Boulevard in the middle of Tehran. The last time Tehranis took to these streets was in 2009, one of the last protests of the Green Movement. Since then, the center of Tehran hasn’t seen any mass protests, and most of these streets have changed, with new urban planning meant to make them more controllable.

Remembering 2009 triggers many things, such as street strategies, tactics and the way we could find each other in the middle of the chaos. But this is us now, almost at the back. Up front, there are many younger people, especially girls. They are extremely brave, fearless and smart.

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