When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

Syrian Activists: At Least 150 Killed By Pro-Regime Forces Near Hama

REUTERS, THE GUARDIAN

Worldcrunch

Syrian activists say pro-government forces killed between 150 and 200 people in the Hama region on Thursday as the United Nations Security Council met to try and negotiate a resolution on Syria, Reuters reports.

The allegations have yet to be independently confirmed. Activists published a video of dead bodies, but there are no indications that its content was filmed in the small village of Tremseh where the massacre is reported to have taken place, the Guardian reports. United Nations monitors are not yet on the ground. and their mandate ends on July 20.

Activists say helicopter gunships and tanks bombarded the village, which was then stormed by pro-government forces. "It appears that Alawite militiamen from surrounding villages descended on Tremseh after its rebel defenders pulled out, and started killing the people. Whole houses have been destroyed and burned from the shelling," an activist told Reuters.

Syrian state television accused "armed terrorist groups' and said three security personnel were killed in Tremesh.

UN security council negotiations have failed to yield any results, as Russia opposed a United Kingdom drafted resolution that proposed to enforce special UN envoy Kofi Annan's plan for political transition enforceable under Chapter 7 of the UN charter, which allows for military intervention.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Society

Kleptomania, How A "Women's Pathology" Was Built On Gender And Class Bias

Between 1880 and 1930, there was a significant rise in thefts in department stores, mostly committed by women from the middle and upper classes. This situation brought with it the establishment of a new pathology: kleptomania. A century later, feminist historians have given new meaning to the practice as a protest against the social structures and oppressions of capitalism and patriarchy.

Photo of a hand in a pocket

A hand in a pocket

Julia Amigo

Kleptomania is defined as the malicious and curious propensity for theft. The legal language tends to specify that the stolen objects are not items of necessity; medically, it is explained as an uncontrollable impulse.

What seems clear is that kleptomania is a highly enigmatic condition and one of the few mental disorders that comes from the pathologization of a crime, which makes it possible to use it as a legal defense. It differs from the sporadic theft of clothing, accessories, or makeup (shoplifting) as the kleptomaniac's impulse is irresistible.

Studies have shown that less than one percent of the population suffers from kleptomania, being much more common among women (although determining exact numbers is very difficult).

The psychiatric disorders manual, DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) has included kleptomania since 1962. Previously, it had already received attention from, among others, Sigmund Freud. Like nymphomania or hysteria, kleptomania became an almost exclusively female diagnosis linked to the biology of women's bodies and an “inability” to resist uncontrollable desire.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest