Geopolitics

Syria’s Gruesome Organ Trade

In Syria and its neighboring countries, an underground network of organ traders has sprung up, preying on the thousands affected by the five-year-long war by offering them desperately needed cash for nonessential organs.

A gunman inside a hospital in Aleppo, Syria
A gunman inside a hospital in Aleppo, Syria
Ahmad Haj Hamdo, Tamer Osman and the Syrian Independent Media Group

DAMASCUS â€" The illegal trade of human organs has become widespread in Syria and neighboring countries, medical officials and victims say, with cross-border networks exploiting thousands of desperate Syrians.

These networks allegedly purchase transplantable organs such as kidneys and corneas from Syrians and ship them to neighboring countries, where they disappear into the murky world of the international organ trade. There are also reports of organs being stolen from prisoners.

Yasser (not his real name) sold one of his own kidneys, which he calls the "worst decision of my life." The 29-year-old fled the fighting in his home city of Homs, in western Syria, around 100 miles north of the capital Damascus, after the start of the war. He made his way to Cairo, Egypt, but like many other Syrian refugees, he had trouble getting work and found himself with no money to survive.

He heard through acquaintances that there were people who would pay for one of his kidneys.

"I was new to Egypt. I did not have any money, and I couldn’t find a job, so my only choice was to sell my left kidney," he said.

A broker invited him to his home and a date was set for medical tests and the operation.

"I sold it for $3,000 to someone I knew nothing about. We met for no more than 15 minutes before we closed the deal," he said.

After the operation, Yasser moved to Istanbul, where he now works in an auto shop and shares a crowded apartment with several other young refugee men. The operation has left him permanently scarred â€" both physically and emotionally â€" and he felt uncomfortable sharing further details of the procedure.

"I will never forgive myself for what I did," said Yasser. He’s experienced pain in his remaining right kidney, and a doctor told him he could die if he is not very careful.

There are no reliable statistics on how widespread the practice of buying and selling organs may be. However, Hussein Nofal, head of the department of forensic medicine at Damascus University and of the newly established General Authority for Forensic Medicine, has been compiling evidence. He estimates that 18,000 Syrians have had organs removed for sale over the past four years of war.

The trade is particularly active in border areas outside the control of Bashar al-Assad’s regime and inside Turkish and Lebanese camps for Syrian refugees, according to Nafal. Organ prices vary across the region: In Turkey someone can purchase a kidney for $10,000, while in Iraq the price may be as low as $1,000. In Lebanon and Syria, the cost hovers around $3,000.

Nafal was also quoted last year in the Lebanese newspaper As-Safir, which is reportedly sympathetic to Assad’s regime, as saying that gangs working with Syrian doctors sell corneas for $7,500 each to foreign clients, falsifying the organs’ country of origin.

Even war-torn countries have laws, but the laws surrounding the organ trade in Syria are opaque, and, with the raging conflict, difficult to enforce or prosecute.

All across Damascus, for instance, hundreds of posters request organ "donations," especially next to hospitals and pharmacies. A typical one reads: "A sick person is in urgent need of a kidney. Blood type needed: O+. Tissue analysis to be done. For those interested in donating, please contact the number below."

Authorities can do little about such advertisements, since under Syrian law organ donations to relatives and strangers are legal. To further evade the law, many organ "donors" who respond to these fliers go to their local courthouse and attest that they are donating, not selling, their organs.

Nevertheless, at least 20 complaints related to the organ trade made their way to the Damascus courts between March 2011 and September 2015. No such cases were seen before the fighting broke out, according to the attorney general of rural Damascus, Ahmad al-Sayyed.

These complaints, which name alleged criminals, as well as doctors and hospitals, have largely been filed by relatives of people who have died. Organ trade cases are considered difficult, if not impossible, to prosecute, since those involved are hard to track down amid the conflict.

However, al-Sayyed estimates that there have been at least 20,000 cases of illegal organ sales across the country since the start of the war, especially in border areas where there are no longer any courts or police officers to enforce the laws.

A judicial source at the Syrian Ministry of Justice who asked to not be named said police do not have the resources to follow up on individual cases to ensure that a person receiving an organ has not paid the "donor."

One oncologist, Dr. Mohammed Awram (not his real name), said the trade is widespread in the northern rural areas of Aleppo and Idlib.

"A dermatologist asked me to sell the organs of pro-government detainees in rural Idlib, since, as he put it, they were going to be executed anyway," said the doctor, who specializes in surgical oncology and traveled to Syria recently to treat patients in the rural areas around Idlib.

The dermatologist explained to him that there were many buyers who were willing to pay, and that the money would be used to buy much-needed medical equipment and to support Syria’s armed opposition groups.

Awram refused on ethical grounds. He was also worried that such operations might lead to innocent people being arrested in order to harvest their organs. His refusal led to accusations that he was working for the Syrian government.

The Islamic State, he said, tried to kill him several times when he attempted to manufacture medicines, so he moved to rural Aleppo when Idlib was overrun with the Islamic extremists.

"The area I moved to was also controlled by the Islamic State, and we saw many cases of corpses with missing internal organs, mostly the liver and left kidney. However, I saw one case of a missing bladder," he said.

Murhaf al-Muallem, director of the Consultative Center for Studies and Human Rights, said his organization has documented dozens of cases of Syrian organs being sold inside and outside Syria.

"The center blames Syria’s neighboring countries for the situation, since they are not providing Syrian refugees with protection or job opportunities, which has led many of them to sell their own organs in order to provide for their families. Their poverty made them easy victims for the organ trade mafias," he said.

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Society

What It Means When The Jews Of Germany No Longer Feel Safe

A neo-Nazi has been buried in the former grave of a Jewish musicologist Max Friedlaender – not an oversight, but a deliberate provocation. This is just one more example of antisemitism on the rise in Germany, and society's inability to respond.

At a protest against antisemitism in Berlin

Eva Marie Kogel

-Essay-

BERLIN — If you want to check the state of your society, there's a simple test: as the U.S. High Commissioner for Germany, John Jay McCloy, said in 1949, the touchstone for a democracy is the well-being of Jews. This litmus test is still relevant today. And it seems Germany would not pass.


Incidents are piling up. Most recently, groups of neo-Nazis from across the country traveled to a church near Berlin for the funeral of a well-known far-right figure. He was buried in the former grave of Jewish musicologist Max Friedlaender, a gravesite chosen deliberately by the right-wing extremists.

The incident at the cemetery

They intentionally chose a Jewish grave as an act of provocation, trying to gain maximum publicity for this act of desecration. And the cemetery authorities at the graveyard in Stahnsdorf fell for it. The church issued an immediate apology, calling it a "terrible mistake" and saying they "must immediately see whether and what we can undo."

There are so many incidents that get little to no media attention.

It's unfathomable that this burial was allowed to take place at all, but now the cemetery authorities need to make a decision quickly about how to put things right. Otherwise, the grave may well become a pilgrimage site for Holocaust deniers and antisemites.

The incident has garnered attention in the international press and it will live long in the memory. Like the case of singer-songwriter Gil Ofarim, who recently claimed he was subjected to antisemitic abuse at a hotel in Leipzig. Details of the crime are still being investigated. But there are so many other incidents that get little to no media attention.

Photo of the grave of Jewish musicologist Max Friedlaender

The grave of Jewish musicologist Max Friedlaender

Jens Kalaene/dpa/ZUMA

Crimes against Jews are rising

Across all parts of society, antisemitism is on the rise. Until a few years ago, Jewish life was seen as an accepted part of German society. Since the attack on the synagogue in Halle in 2019, the picture has changed: it was a bitter reminder that right-wing terror against Jewish people has a long, unbroken history in Germany.

Stories have abounded about the coronavirus crisis being a Jewish conspiracy; meanwhile, Muslim antisemitism is becoming louder and more forceful. The anti-Israel boycott movement BDS rears its head in every debate on antisemitism, just as left-wing or post-colonial thinking are part of every discussion.

Jewish life needs to be allowed to step out of the shadows.

Since 2015, the number of antisemitic crimes recorded has risen by about a third, to 2,350. But victims only report around 20% of cases. Some choose not to because they've had bad experiences with the police, others because they're afraid of the perpetrators, and still others because they just want to put it behind them. Victims clearly hold out little hope of useful reaction from the state – so crimes go unreported.

And the reality of Jewish life in Germany is a dark one. Sociologists say that Jewish children are living out their "identity under siege." What impact does it have on them when they can only go to nursery under police protection? Or when they hear Holocaust jokes at school?

Germany needs to take its antisemitism seriously

This shows that the country of commemorative services and "stumbling blocks" placed in sidewalks as a memorial to victims of the Nazis has lost its moral compass. To make it point true north again, antisemitism needs to be documented from the perspective of those affected, making it visible to the non-Jewish population. And Jewish life needs to be allowed to step out of the shadows.

That is the first thing. The second is that we need to talk about specifically German forms of antisemitism. For example, the fact that in no other EU country are Jewish people so often confronted about the Israeli government's policies (according to a survey, 41% of German Jews have experienced this, while the EU average is 28%). Projecting the old antisemitism onto the state of Israel offers people a more comfortable target for their arguments.

Our society needs to have more conversations about antisemitism. The test of German democracy, as McCloy called it, starts with taking these concerns seriously and talking about them. We need to have these conversations because it affects all of us. It's about saving our democracy. Before it's too late.

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