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ABC AUSTRALIA, THE BRISBANE TIMES, SYDNEY MORNING HERALD (Australia)

Worldcrunch

SUNSHINE COAST- While some spots in the northern hemisphere are covered in snow, the Sunshine Coast in Queensland, Australia has been covered in something that looks a little bit like it - sea foam.

Revellers on the Sunshine Coast lap up yesterday's foam-tacularbit.ly/WtlLHp#bigwet Pic: brandonrooney.comtwitter.com/newscomauHQ/st…

— news.com.au (@newscomauHQ) January 28, 2013

This phenomenon occurs every few years and is caused by the agitation of seawater (Tropical Cyclone Oswald in this case) especially when it contains higher concentrations of dissolved organic matter. As the seawater is churned by the waves, bubbles are formed and they stick to each other through the surface tension. As the foam has a low density and persistence, the onshore winds can blow it inland from the beaches, according to Wikipedia.

The Brisbane Times reports that Toxicologist, Professor Barry Noller has warned against playing in the foam for fear that it may contain pollutants, toxins and sewage. ABC Australia also writes that Professor Rodger Tomlinson is also warning against it because of "what lies beneath" the foam.

"You don't know whether there are rocks under there, broken glass... so I think there's a real concern about safety.” Among the various videos circulating on YouTube expand=1] (scroll down), there's one of two police officers almost being hit by a car that had suddenly burst out from the foam.

Drinking supplies risk running out in Brisbane, and authorities have asked people to cut back on water usage according to ABC.

These floods, which come just a week after some of the hottest temperatures on record in Australia, which have left four Queenslanders dead and two missing. The Sydney Morning Herald reports that 1,200 homes have been damaged.

As the rain continues, flood warnings are in place for 14 rivers in the neighboring state New South Wales, leaving 41,000 people cut off. This morning Sydney received 10 centimeters of water in just 24 hours.

Just found this pic on the SEQ flood update facebook page... nice work cows! #bigwettwitter.com/James_L_Bennet…

— James Bennett (@James_L_Bennett) January 29, 2013

Video via YouTube expand=1]

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Geopolitics

The West Must Face Reality: Iran's Nuclear Program Can't Be Stopped

The West is insisting on reviving a nuclear pact with Iran. However, this will only postpone the inevitable moment when the regime declares it has a nuclear bomb. The only solution is regime change.

Talks to renew the 2015 pact have lasted for 16 months but some crucial sticking points remain.

Hamed Mohammadi

-OpEd-

Rafael Grossi, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the UN's nuclear inspectorate, declared on Sept. 7 that Iran already had more than enough uranium for an atomic bomb. He said the IAEA could no longer confirm that the Islamic Republic has a strictly peaceful nuclear program as it has always claimed because the agency could not properly inspect sites inside Iran.

The Islamic Republic may have shown flexibility in some of its demands in the talks to renew the 2015 nuclear pact with world powers, a preliminary framework reached between Iran and the P5+1 (the U.S., the U.K., China, Russia, France and Germany). For example, it no longer insists that the West delist its Revolutionary Guards as a terrorist organization. But it has kept its crucial promise that unless Western powers lift all economic sanctions, the regime will boost its uranium reserves and their level of enrichment, as well as restrict the IAEA's access to installations.

Talks to renew the 2015 pact have been going on for 16 months. European diplomacy has resolved most differences between the sides, but some crucial sticking points remain.

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