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KOMMERSANT (Russia), BBC, CNN

Worldcrunch

KIROV - Russian protest leader Alexei Navalny was sentenced to five years in jail for theft and embezzlement on Thursday.

The Kirov City Court found the anti-corruption campaigner guilty of defrauding about $500,000 worth of lumber from a state-run company, reports Russia's Kommersant.

The tough sentence did not come as a surprise for the 37-year-old activist, who described the trial as "a farce".

Navalny is one of Vladimir Putin"s most outspoken critics. Three months ago, he depicted the Russian President as a foe of democracy, reports CNN.

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Alexei Navalny - Photo: Alexey Yushenkov

A few minutes before he was handcuffed during the trial and led away, he urged his supporters to continue his struggle, tweeting : "Don't sit around doing nothing", reports the BBC.

Alexei Navalny registered as a candidate in Moscow mayoral race, but if his conviction stands, the opposition blogger will not be able to run for public office.

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Green Or Gone

A/C And Global Warming: A Northern Call To Embrace Air Conditioning

Misguided arguments about air conditioning's environmental impact are stopping people from installing systems in homes and offices. But in the age of solar power, there's no need to stew in your own sweat "for the sake of the planet."

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