When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

BBC NEWS (UK), TIMES OF INDIA, HINDUSTAN TIMES (India)

Worldcrunch

ALLAHABAD – At least 36 pilgrims on their way back from the world’s largest religious festival in northern India have died in a stampede late Sunday.

The death toll may rise again, as dozens of other injured were in a critical condition after the stampede at the Allahabad railway station in the north Indian state of Uttar Pradesh in India.

Tens of thousands of people were in the station waiting to board a train back home on the last day of the 55-day Kumbh Mela festival when railway officials announced a last-minute change in the platform, triggering the chaos, the Hindustan Times reveals.

Witnesses have blamed police action for the stampede, accusing them of charging with batons when the crowd started moving toward the platform through a footbridge – claims that have been denied by the police who stated it was simply a case of overcrowding.

A record 30 million people (the world's largest gathering of humanity) were drawn to the festival to dip in the sacred waters of the Ganges.

Mohammad Azam Khan, the Uttar Pradesh government minister, resigned Monday, taking responsibility for the Allahabad stampede, according to The Times of India.

Meanwhile in neighboring Bangladesh, a bus carrying Muslim pilgrims who were also back from religious voyage to the Cox's Bazar district has fallen off a bridge south of the country’s capital, Dhaka, killing at least 16 people, BBC News reports.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

How Istanbul Became The Top Destination For Russians Fleeing Conscription

Hundreds of thousands of men have left Russia since partial mobilization was announced. Turkey, which still has air routes open with Moscow, is one of their top choices. But life is far from easy once they land.

A passenger aboard a ferry docked at Kadikoy pier in Istanbul, Turkey.

Timour Ozturk

ISTANBUL — Sitting on a bench in front of the Sea of Marmara, Albert tries to roll a cigarette despite the wind blowing his blonde hair strands. This 31-year-old political philosophy doctor is staying at a friend’s place in Kadıköy, a trendy neighborhood on the Asian bank of Istanbul and popular amongst expats.

On Friday, Sept. 23, Albert left Moscow, where he was visiting his parents, with two shirts and two pairs of pants hastily shoved in a backpack. “When I heard about the annexation referendums in the new Ukrainian territories, I knew the situation would get worse. I thought I had a few more days. But when Putin announced the partial mobilization on the morning of Sept. 21, I booked my tickets right away.”

Albert had tried to stir up a student movement against the war in St. Petersburg. He was arrested with his partner on Feb. 27, spent a night in jail and was fined a few hundred euros. They persevered and took part in protests but in April, while he was going to a demonstration, he was arrested once again. His detention lasted five days.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ