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Goodbye 2016!
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PARIS — Our crack staff of serious but seriously subjective journalists, translators and editors have chosen what we believe to be the year's most engaging and provocative Worldcrunch stories.

America And Us, Trump's Victory Is Very Bad News For The World

FRANCE — Les Echos, Nov. 21


Panama Papers: Link Between Magnitsky Probe And Putin's Cellist Pal

GERMANY — Süddeutsche Zeitung, May 4


Letter From A Turkish Prison, When A Journalist Writes About Erdogan

TURKEY — Le Monde, Jan. 14


The German Detective Hunting Down The Last Nazis In Brazil

BRAZIL — Folha de S. Paulo, April 8


Flaws And All, The World Will Miss Barack Obama

GERMANY — Die Welt, Nov. 4


Botticelli to Body Shaming: How Our Ideal Of Beauty Went Awry

ARGENTINA — Clarin, March 28


At Former Soviet Nuclear Test Site, "Best Not To Take Souvenirs'

KAZAKHSTAN — Kommersant, Sept. 23


How To Buy Antiquities Looted By ISIS From An Italian Mobster

ITALY — La Stampa, Oct. 19


Brexit, The Tough Lessons Europe Must Learn

FRANCE — Le Monde, June 24


Trump Victory: We'll Never Talk About Globalization The Same Way Again

UNITED STATES — Le Figaro, Nov. 13


A Woman's Sacred Right To Wear Shorts — Or A Headscarf

TURKEY — Cumhuriyet, Sept. 30


Little Britain, Petite Europe — Lost In This Big Bad World

FRANCE — Les Echos, June 28


Poland's Abortion Battle, Why Free Women Are Done With Weak Men

POLAND — Gazeta Wyborcza, Oct. 27


Muslim And Hipster, Why "Mipster" Fashion Is Trending

SWITZERLAND — Le Temps, June 4


Time To Choose Between Oil Wealth And Saving The Planet

ARGENTINA — Clarin, July 21


A Father's Perilous Hunt For His Sons, Lost To Syria And ISIS

GERMANY — Die Welt, April 4

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Future

Injecting Feminism Into Science Is A Good Thing — For Science

Feminists have generated a set of tools to make science less biased and more robust. Why don’t more scientists use it?

As objective as any man

Anto Magzan/ZUMA
Rachel E. Gross

-Essay-

In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, a mystery played out across news headlines: Men, it seemed, were dying of infection at twice the rate of women. To explain this alarming disparity, researchers looked to innate biological differences between the sexes — for instance, protective levels of sex hormones, or distinct male-female immune responses. Some even went so far as to test the possibility of treating infected men with estrogen injections.

This focus on biological sex differences turned out to be woefully inadequate, as a group of Harvard-affiliated researchers pointed out earlier this year. By analyzing more than a year of sex-disaggregated COVID-19 data, they showed that the gender gap was more fully explained by social factors like mask-wearing and distancing behaviors (less common among men) and testing rates (higher among pregnant women and health workers, who were largely female).

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Writing contest - My pandemic story
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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

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