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St. Petersburg Metro Bombing On Front Pages In Russia

A candle-lit vigil for the victims of a bombing in St. Petersburg was pictured on the front page of Russian newspaper Izvestia. In an article entitled "St. Petersburg Survived," the paper reported that the Monday attack had failed to cause mass panic in the city.

At least 11 people were killed and scores others injured after a bomb exploded on Monday afternoon between the metro stations Tekhnologichesky Institut and Sennaya Ploshchad.

Law enforcement is investigating a suspected suicide bomber's links to radical Islam but so far no group has claimed the attack. Authorities declared three days of mourning in St. Petersburg. World leaders offered their condolences to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

"I'm very clear, as the people of the UK were after the attack in London, that we will prevail. The terrorists will not win," said British Prime Minister Theresa May, according to the BBC.

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Image of a group of police officers, in uniform, on their motorbikes in the street.

Police officers from the Memphis Police Department, in Memphis, USA.

Ian T. Adams and Seth W. Stoughton

The officers charged in the fatal beating of Tyre Nichols were not your everyday uniformed patrol officers.

Rather, they were part of an elite squad: Memphis Police Department’s SCORPION team. A rather tortured acronym for “Street Crimes Operation to Restore Peace in Our Neighborhoods,” SCORPION is a crime suppression unit – that is, officers detailed specifically to prevent, detect and interrupt violent crime by proactively using stops, frisks, searches and arrests. Such specialized units are common in forces across the U.S. and tend to rely on aggressive policing tactics.

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