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A passenger ship with 477 people aboard sank off South Korea's southwest coast Wednesday morning
A passenger ship with 477 people aboard sank off South Korea's southwest coast Wednesday morning
Worldcrunch

UKRAINE STANDOFF CONTINUES
At least five armored vehicles flying Russian banners were reported to have entered the town of Slaviansk, north of Donetsk, as the standoff between Kiev and pro-Russian protesters continues in the eastern part of Ukraine. Although most Western media organizations initially described the vehicles as Russian, Moscow media outlets and Der Spiegel say they are in fact Ukrainian tanks and that a group of soldiers has defected to the pro-Russian side. The German magazine quotes the Ukrainian troops as saying: "We haven't had anything decent to eat for weeks. Kiev has forgotten us." Meanwhile, AFP reports that 20 pro-Russian gunmen entered the mayor’s office in Donetsk, demanding a referendum on Ukraine’s federalization.

  • The Ukrainian security service claims to have intercepted communications that show Russians commanders are controlling pro-Russian protesters in eastern Ukraine and had given them “shoot to kill” orders. This comes as Ukraine’s Interim Prime Minister Arseny Yatsenyuk accused Russia of “exporting terrorism,” adding that “today's events are starting to endanger Europe and the European Union.” He declared that Moscow has “decided to build a new Berlin Wall and return to the Cold War era.” Read more from RTÉ.

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Society

End Of Roe v. Wade, The World Is Watching

As the Supreme Court decides to overturn the 1973 decision that guaranteed abortion rights, many fear an imminent threat to abortion rights in the U.S. But in other countries, the global fight for sexual and reproductive rights is going in different directions.

"Don't abort my right" At 2019 pro-choice march In Toulouse, France.

Alain Pitton/NurPhoto via ZUMA
Hannah Steinkopf-Frank and Sophia Constantino

PARIS — Nearly 50 years after it ensured the right to abortion to Americans, the United States Supreme Court overturned the Roe v. Wade case, meaning that millions of women in the U.S. may lose their constitutional right to abortion.

The groundbreaking decision is likely to set off a range of restrictions on abortion access in multiple states in the U.S., half of which are expected to implement new bans on the procedure. Thirteen have already passed "trigger laws" that will automatically make abortion illegal.

U.S. President Joe Biden called the ruling "a tragic error" and urged individual states to enact laws to allow the procedure.

In a country divided on such a polarizing topic, the decision is likely to cause major shifts in American law and undoubtedly spark outrage among the country’s pro-choice groups. Yet the impact of such a momentous shift, like others in the United States, is also likely to reverberate around the world — and perhaps, eventually, back again in the 50 States.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

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