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BEIJING DAILY

Shot Of Trouble: Fake Botox In China

Real thing in China?
Real thing in China?
Lisa Lane

BEIJING — Authorities have carried out a series of raids on beauty salons in the Chinese capital in an effort to crack down on counterfeit Botox, The Beijing News reports.

Botox is popular in China, where many young women aspire to have a thin V-shape face. But the high price of injections, which require regular follow-up sessions at clinics, has resulted in many women seeking black-market options that involve fake products, the article claims.

Counterfeit Botox is bought for up to 300 RMB ($45) and sold for many times that amount through aggressive social media promotion, online chat platforms and word-of-mouth. The injections are done in beauty parlors, rented apartments or hotel rooms. A Botox session takes only a few minutes, and is often referred to as the "lunch break cosmetic" in China,

"The black market is almost out of control," Dr. Wang Zhongjie, a member of Chinese Medical Association, told the news outlet.

Unqualified beauticians carry out the injections. "It may be injected into a blood vessel by these people without professional medical training," said Xiu Zhifu, a plastic surgeon.

Vanity, it would seem, has no limits.

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Geopolitics

Smaller Allies Matter: Afghanistan Offers Hard Lessons For Ukraine's Future

Despite controversies at home, Nordic countries were heavily involved in the NATO-led war in Afghanistan. As the Ukraine war grinds on, lessons from that conflict are more relevant than ever.

Photo of Finnish Defence Forces in Afghanistan

Finnish Defence Forces in Afghanistan

Johannes Jauhiainen

-Analysis-

HELSINKI — In May 2021, the Taliban took back power in Afghanistan after 20 years of international presence, astronomical sums of development aid and casualties on all warring sides.

As Kabul fell, a chaotic evacuation prompted comparisons to the fall of Saigon — and most of the attention was on the U.S., which had led the original war to unseat the Taliban after 9/11 and remained by far the largest foreign force on the ground. Yet, the fall of Kabul was also a tumultuous and troubling experience for a number of other smaller foreign countries who had been presented for years in Afghanistan.

In an interview at the time, Antti Kaikkonen, the Finnish Minister of Defense, tried to explain what went wrong during the evacuation.

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“Originally we anticipated that the smaller countries would withdraw before the Americans. Then it became clear that getting people to the airport had become more difficult," Kaikkonen said. "So we decided last night to bring home our last soldiers who were helping with the evacuation.”

During the 20-year-long Afghan war, the foreign troop presence included many countries:Finland committed around 2,500 soldiers,Sweden 8,000,Denmark 12,000 and Norway 9,000. And in the nearly two years since the end of the war, Finland,Belgium and theNetherlands have commissioned investigations into their engagements in Afghanistan.

As the number of fragile or failed states around the world increases, it’s important to understand how to best organize international development aid and the security of such countries. Twenty years of international engagement in Afghanistan offers valuable lessons.

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