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Hong Kong

Search For Survivors Continues After Hong Kong Ferry Tragedy

SOUTH CHINA MORNING POST, THE STANDARD (Hong Kong), BBC NEWS (UK)

Worldcrunch

HONG KONG - A large-scale rescue search is still looking for potential survivors after two ferries collided southwest of Hong Kong on Monday night, leaving at least 36 people dead, Hong Kong’s The Standard reports.

"All of Hong Kong's emergency forces are focused here," Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying told BBC News. "Wide-ranging rescue work is being carried out in the sea, on land and in the air."

One of the boats involved in the accident, the Lamma IV ferry, was taking more than 120 people -- mainly employees of Hongkong Electric and their family members -- to watch fireworks display in celebration of China’s National Day, Hong Kong’s South China Morning Post reports.

It collided at very high speed with a Hong Kong and Kowloon Ferry headed for Lamma Island at around 8.30pm, in what is considered the deadliest boat accident in Hong Kong in forty years.

Leung Chun-ying promised an investigation into the accident. Police already arrested six crew members from the two vessels on suspicion of endangering the safety of others at sea.

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Coronavirus

Why Making COVID Predictions Is Actually Getting Harder

We know more about COVID than ever before, but that doesn't make it easier to predict what will happen this year. It also remains to be seen if we'll put the lessons we learned into practice.

​A young boy who arrived on a Cathay Pacific flight from Hong Kong wears a face mask and face shield at Vancouver International Airport in Canada on Jan. 10, 2023.

A young boy who arrived from Hong Kong wears a face mask and face shield at Vancouver International Airport in Canada on Jan. 10, 2023.

Duncan Robertson

In 2020, we knew very little about the novel virus that was to become known as COVID-19. Now, as we enter 2023, a search of Google Scholar produces around five million results containing the term.

So how will the pandemic be felt in 2023? This question is in some ways impossible to answer, given a number of unknowns. In early 2020, the scientific community was focused on determining key parameters that could be used to make projections as to the severity and extent of the spread of the virus. Now, the complex interplay of COVID variants, vaccination and natural immunity makes that process far more difficult and less predictable.

But this doesn’t mean there’s room for complacency. The proportion of people estimated to be infected has varied over time, but this figure has not fallen below 1.25% (or one in 80 people) in England for the entirety of 2022. COVID is very much still with us, and people are being infected time and time again.

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