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RUE89, BVA (FRANCE)

Worldcrunch

PARIS - In an exclusive interview with right-wing magazine Valeurs Actuelles, former French President Nicolas Sarkozy announced that he was thinking about a political comeback.

After his defeat at the last presidential elections, Sarkozy had said he was leaving politics for good.

According to Rue 89, the interview will be published in tomorrow's edition of Valeurs Actuelles.

In the interview, Sarkozy says: “There will be, unfortunately, a moment where the question is no longer "do you want to?" but "do you have a choice?" In which case, I won't be able to tell myself anymore: I am happy, I take my daughter to school and I take part in conferences around the world. And so when that does happen, I will have to come back. Not by choice, but by duty to my country.”

Rue89 notes that Sarkozy's daughter must be very precocious if is already in school at 17-months. French children usually start school when they are three years old and potty-trained.

Nicolas Sarkozy goes on to say he hates politics: "It should be clear that I really don't want to deal with the political world, which bores me to death. And look how I was treated! ... Do you really think I want to come back? Don't forget how they treated my wife."

Sarkozy's wife is former Italian-born model Carla Bruni.

The 58-year-old former French president tells Valeurs Actuelles that the only reason he is coming back into the spotlight is because of the severity of the crisis: “There will be a social crisis. And then we will have a most violent financial crisis and it will create political havoc. French people are more afraid than they are angry right now.”

However, in a poll published last month by BVA, 62% of people said they didn't want Sarkozy to run for the 2017 presidential elections.

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Nicolas Sarkozy. Photo by: Moritz Hager

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Geopolitics

Why Fast-Tracking Ukraine's NATO Entry Is Such A Bad Idea

Ukraine's President Zelensky should not be putting pressure for NATO membership now. It raises the risk of a wider war, and the focus should be on continuing arms deliveries from the West. After all, peace will be decided on the battlefield.

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Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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As understandable as it is that his country wants to join a strong defensive military alliance like NATO, the timing is wrong. Of course, we must acknowledge the Ukrainian people's heroic fight for survival. But Zelensky must be careful not to overstretch the West's willingness to support him.

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