When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

Rising Brazil-U.S. Tensions Over Spying Allegations From Snowden Leak

Will Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff call off a state visit to Washington?

Happier times between allies of the Americas
Happier times between allies of the Americas
Tai Nalon

BRASILIA — Brazil is simply not buying the explanations coming out of Washington after recent reports that documents leaked by Edward Snowden showed that the U.S spied on Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff.

Reuterscites an unnamed Brazilian government source as saying a Rousseff trip to Washington scheduled next month is at risk, along with certain trade partnerships, if the U.S. does not clarify or publicly apology for accusations that the National Security Agency (NSA) tracked emails, text messages and phone calls of Rousseff, as well as Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto.

Brazilian Communications Minister Paulo Bernardo told Folha de S. Paulo that the justifications the U.S. gave to the Brazilian government about alleged espionage in the country "weren't true." According to the minister, Brazil is hoping to get "reasonable explanations," especially as regards alleged interceptions of Rousseff's conversations as cited by Globo TV that were circulated by former NSA contractor Snowden.

"Absolutely no reasonable explanations have been given by the U.S.. In fact, from the start all the explanations given to us have turned out to be false. After the embassy's justifications and, later, our team's visit to the U.S., further investigation showed they weren't plausible.

"We are still waiting," said Bernardo, who characterized the American behavior as "unjustifiable." Still, he added that it was up to the Brazilian president and her diplomatic team to decide whether or not to go to Washington for October's state visit.

Up to her

"I think demanding explanations from the American government is the appropriate action," Bernardo says. "I believe that diplomacy is needed to solve this problem. This is embarrassing us — as well as other countries, such as Mexico, Germany, France."

He thinks that there isn't the "slightest possibility" that the U.S. are spying on Brazil to monitor possible terrorist attacks. "That's industrial, commercial tracking to find out about pre-salt and other important commercial or economic matters. Thus, it's worse than it seems at a first glance."

Brazil's Vice President Michel Temer has also criticized the U.S. behavior as "unacceptable," but said that he believes that the matter will soon be "tactfully" settled.

As for whether Rousseff should postpone her trip to Washington, he stated, "The president can decide for herself. In my opinion, this will be taken care of diplomatically and in time for the president to visit the United States."

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!

Russian President Vladimir Putin

Anna Akage, Shaun Lavelle and Emma Albright

The last sighting of Vladimir Putin was five days ago, when the Russian President appeared at the inauguration of a giant Ferris wheel in Moscow.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

Since then, as the Ukrainian army’s major counter-offensive in the northeast and south has gained momentum, and Russian troops make a hasty retreat, Putin has disappeared from the public space and made no comments on the dramatic events on the front of what he continues to call a “special military operation.”

The same is true of Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu, considered a loyal Putin insider and chief architect of the war, who has made no appearances or declarations.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ