When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Enjoy unlimited access to quality journalism.

Limited time offer

Get your 30-day free trial!

EKANTIPUR (Nepal), AFP (France), CNN (USA)

Worldcrunch

Rescue workers have resumed their search Monday morning for mountaineers trapped by an avalanche on Mount Manaslu in Nepal.

At least 11 people have been confirmed dead, reports Nepal's Ekantipur news publication, including climbers from France, Spain, Germany and Nepal.

AFP reported that Christian Trommsdorff, the vice-president of the French mountain guides' union, confirmed that two of the deceased were guides working in the Chamonix region of the French Alps.

Nepalese officials said the group of around 25 to 30 climbers were camped near the summit of the Himalayan mountain (7,300 meters above sea-level) in Nepal, Sunday, when the avalanche hit.

At least 13 climbers have been evacuated by air to a hospital in the capital, Kathmandu, with local sherpa guides continuing rescue efforts.

Rescue operations had been halted due to extremely bad weather and poor visibility, however they have now been resumed.

Mount Manaslu is the eighth largest mountain in the world and is considered to be one of the most dangerous.

CNN questioned whether the Himalayan Mountains have become too crowded. The news broadcaster reported of over-crowding on Mount Everest, with climbers subjected to frost bite and lack of oxygen after being forced to wait too long to summit, due to the growing popularity of commercial expeditions in the mountain range.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Coronavirus

Chinese Students' "Absurd" Protest Against COVID Rules: Public Crawling

While street demonstrations have spread in China to protest the strict Zero-COVID regulations, some Chinese university students have taken up public acts of crawling to show what extended harsh lockdowns are doing to their mental state.

​Screenshot of a video showing Chinese students crawling on a soccer pitch

Screenshot of a video showing Chinese students crawling

Shuyue Chen

Since last Friday, the world has watched a wave of street protests have taken place across China as frustration against extended lockdowns reached a boiling point. But even before protesters took to the streets, Chinese university students had begun a public demonstration that challenges and shames the state's zero-COVID rules in a different way: public displays of crawling, as a kind of absurdist expression of their repressed anger under three years of strict pandemic control.

Xin’s heart was beating fast as her knees reached the ground. It was her first time joining the strange scene at the university sports field, so she put on her hat and face mask to cover her identity.

Kneeling down, with her forearms supporting her body from the ground, Xin started crawling with three other girls as a group, within a larger demonstration of other small groups. As they crawled on, she felt the sense of fear and embarrassment start to disappear. It was replaced by a liberating sense of joy, which had been absent in her life as a university student in lockdown for so long.

Yes, crawling in public has become a popular activity among Chinese university students recently. There have been posters and videos of "volunteer crawling" across universities in China. At first, it was for the sake of "fun." Xin, like many who participated, thought it was a "cult-like ritual" in the beginning, but she changed her mind. "You don't care about anything when crawling, not thinking about the reason why, what the consequences are. You just enjoy it."

The reality out there for Chinese university students has been grim. For Xin, her university started daily COVID-19 testing in November, and deliveries, including food, are banned. Apart from the school gate, all exits have been padlock sealed.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest