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LE DEVOIR (Canada)

MONTREAL - Student demonstrations in Quebec took a new, loud turn last night in Montreal, as demonstrators crowded city streets and banged on pots and pans in response to a new law limiting protests, Le Devoir reported.

Demonstrators started their noisy procession around 8 p.m local time in Montreal and other cities. Students were joined by other groups such as seniors to protest the new measure, called law 78, which was hastily voted this Wednesday in order to restrict the right to protest without police authorization, and bans large demonstrations near school premises.

Quebec officials are hoping to quell the on-going student protests, which have swelled in recent weeks. On Wednesday night more than 700 people were arrested for violating the new law, which is attached with heavy fines.

The protest Thursday night was peaceful and did not result in similar mass arrests. Watch an amateur video of the demonstrators below.

Students in Quebec have been on strike since last February when Prime Minister Jean Charest announced a 75% increase of university fees, or approximately $250 per year over seven years. Annual university tuition rates currently stand at $2,150, one of Canada's lowest.

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