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CLARIN (Argentina); EL NACIONAL (Venezuela); AP

Worldcrunch

CARACAS - Protests in the Venezuelan capital have turned violent in the wake of presidential electoral results, which gave Nicolas Maduro a slim majority but prompted opposition calls for a recount.

After Sunday night's official declaration of Maduro as winner with 50.7% of the vote, opposition candidate Henrique Capriles called on the National Electoral Council (CNE) to conduct a full nationwide recount, citing irregularities at the polls. Earlier, Capriles, who had lost to Hugo Chavez last year, had urged his supporters to protest peacefully in the event of a victory by Maduro, the handpicked successor of Chavez, who died on March 5 after a long battle with cancer.

Pro-Capriles student protests Monday afternoon began peacefully, but later turned violent as they threw stones and concrete slabs at police, who responded with tear gas and rubber bullets, writes Clarin.

via Facebook

via Facebook

Pro-government Venezuelan daily El Nacional reported that Maduro charged the opposition with failing to recognize democratic institutions, and warned that Capriles might be organizing a coup.

President of the National Assembly, Diosdado Cabello, wrote on his Twitter page that the Assembly will be investigating Capriles, blaming him for the violence that began after the elections. “Capriles is a fascist. I’ll personally ensure that he will pay for the damage to our country and our people."

Capriles fascista, me encargaré personalmente que pagues por todo el daño que le estás haciendo a nuestra Patria y a nuestro Pueblo

— Diosdado Cabello R (@dcabellor) April 16, 2013

Clarin reports that more protests began at 8 pm local time on Monday, at the same time that Maduro was speaking at a press conference, coming just hours after the CNE declared him as president elect.

The cacerolazo protest consisted of people banging pots and pans to show how loud their discontent truly was, says the AP.

@dansemprun

@fensita

@kamvenezuela79

@mrookie

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Geopolitics

New Probe Finds Pro-Bolsonaro Fake News Dominated Social Media Through Campaign

Ahead of Brazil's national elections Sunday, the most interacted-with posts on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Telegram and WhatsApp contradict trustworthy information about the public’s voting intentions.

Jair Bolsonaro bogus claims perform well online

Cris Faga/ZUMA
Laura Scofield and Matheus Santino

SÂO PAULO — If you only got your news from social media, you might be mistaken for thinking that Jair Bolsonaro is leading the polls for Brazil’s upcoming presidential elections, which will take place this Sunday. Such a view flies in the face of what most of the polling institutes registered with the Superior Electoral Court indicate.

An exclusive investigation by the Brazilian investigative journalism agency Agência Pública has revealed how the most interacted-with and shared posts in Brazil on social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Telegram and WhatsApp share data and polls that suggest victory is certain for the incumbent Bolsonaro, as well as propagating conspiracy theories based on false allegations that research institutes carrying out polling have been bribed by Bolsonaro’s main rival, former president Luís Inácio Lula da Silva, or by his party, the Workers’ Party.

Agência Pública’s reporters analyzed the most-shared posts containing the phrase “pesquisa eleitoral” [electoral polls] in the period between the official start of the campaigning period, on August 16, to September 6. The analysis revealed that the most interacted-with and shared posts on social media spread false information or predicted victory for Jair Bolsonaro.

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