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Geopolitics

P.R. Nightmare: Porn Star Luka Magnotta And His “Killer Beer”

A little lesson in what not to do when a porn star killer posts a photo of himself on Facebook drinking a bottle of your delicious beer.

The Labatt/Magnotta debacle prompted an outpouring of sarcastic responses on Twitter (DennisVanStaalduinen)
The Labatt/Magnotta debacle prompted an outpouring of sarcastic responses on Twitter (DennisVanStaalduinen)

BERLIN - Somewhere in Canada, Charlie Angelakos, marketing head of the Labatt beer brand, may have just faced the most uncomfortable meeting he ever had with his bosses. Because his department made one, but crucial, mistake: it tried to get the Montreal Gazette to take down a picture on its site featuring Luka Rocco Magnotta, porn actor and alleged murderer, holding a bottle of Labatt Blue beer.

Angelakos asked that "in view of the nature of the story" the picture be removed and another, Labatt-less picture of the alleged killer be used – and promptly unleashed a galloping case of what is known as the "Streisand effect."

According to this rule, asking for the removal of any reference or image, particularly online, automatically engenders the high-profile publicity you hoped to avoid by asking for removal – indeed much more publicity than you would have faced if nothing had been undertaken. What's more, because it's online, it hangs around for much longer than anything in the print or visual media would.

Magnotta, dubbed the "Canadian psycho," is suspected of having killed a Chinese student, cut up his body, and sent the parts out in parcels by mail. The alleged killer, having fled Canada, was arrested in an Internet café in Berlin.

Essentially, albeit unwittingly, Angelakos has cemented Labatt beer, for the foreseeable future anyway, in the minds of consumers as "killer beer." The photo has now been copied thousands of times, posted on blogs, featured in media reports. And tweeters are going crazy outdoing each other on #newlabattcampaign with snappy lines such as: "I'd give an arm and a leg for a Labatt."

Read the full article in German by Benedikt Fuest

Photo - DennisVanStaalduinen

*This is a digest item, not a direct translation

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Geopolitics

It's Not About Mussolini, Searching For The Real Giorgia Meloni

As the right-wing coalition tops Italian elections, far-right leader of the Brothers of Italy, Giorgia Meloni, is set to become Italy's next prime minister. Both her autobiography and the just concluded campaign help fill in the holes in someone whose roots are in Italy's post-fascist political parties.

Giorgia Meloni at a political rally in Palermo on Sept. 20.

Alessandro Calvi

-Analysis-

ROME — After Sunday’s national election results, Italy is set to have its first ever woman prime minister. But Giorgia Meloni has been drawing extra attention both inside and outside of the country because of her ideology, not her gender.

Her far-right pedigree in a country that invented fascism a century ago has had commentators rummaging through the past of Meloni and her colleagues in the Brothers of Italy party in search of references to Benito Mussolini.

But even as her victory speech spoke of uniting the country, it is far more useful to listen to what she herself has said since entering politics to understand the vision the 45-year-old lifelong politician has for Italy’s future.

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