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Geopolitics

Paving Way For John Paul II Sainthood, Vatican Doctors Proclaim Second Miracle

LA STAMPA (Italy)

Worldcrunch

VATICAN CITY - The canonization of Pope John Paul II could be celebrated as soon as October, writes La Stampa, as Vatican sources say a presumed miracle has been approved by Church doctors.

The beloved Polish pontiff, who died in April 2005, is on his way to sainthood in record time. The second miracle -- as yet undisclosed -- has occurred after his beatification, and has been verified by a medical panel. The miracle must now be approved by theologians, and then by the cardinals and bishops of the Congregation, before finally being submitted to Pope Francis for the final “yes”.

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Photo by Ejdzej

Monsignor Slawomir Oder filed for a preliminary council of an alleged miraculous healing back in January, yet it was kept quiet until now. Although a date has not yet been announced, La Stampa"s Vatican correspondent Andrea Tornielli points out that it could potentially coincide with the feast day of Pope John Paul II on October 22nd.

As it is only eight years since his death, this is considered a very fast canonization. Emeritus-Pope Benedict XVI had celebrated the beatification quickly on May 1, 2011, and it has been indicated that Pope Francis is in favor of fast-tracking the sainthood of the second-longest serving pope in history.

The canonization of Karol Wojtyla will make him the second pope from the 20th century to be proclaimed a saint, after Pius X. Two others have been beatified, but not yet declared saints, and three more have been put to the council for consideration for sainthood. This shows that, in terms of the papacy, the 20th century may turn out to be quite crowded with halos.

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Geopolitics

Utter Pessimism, What Israelis And Palestinians Share In Common

Right now, according to a joint survey of Israelis and Palestinians, hopes for a peaceful solution of coexistence simply don't exist. The recent spate of violence is confirmation of the deepest kind of pessimism on both sides for any solution other than domination of the other.

An old Palestinian protester waves Palestinian flag while he confronts the Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the village of Beit Dajan near the West Bank city of Nablus.

A Palestinian protester confronts Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the West Bank village of Beit Dajan on Jan. 6.

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — Just before the latest outbreak of violence between Israelis and Palestinians, a survey of public opinion among the two peoples provided a key to understanding the current situation unfolding before our eyes.

It was a joint study, entitled "Palestinian-Israeli Pulse", carried out by two research centers, one Israeli, the other Palestinian, which for years have been regularly asking the same questions to both sides.

The result is disastrous: not only is the support for the two-state solution — Israel and Palestine side by side — at its lowest point in two decades, but there is now a significant share of opinion on both sides that favors a "non-democratic" solution, i.e., a single state controlled by either the Israelis or Palestinians.

This captures the absolute sense of pessimism commonly felt regarding the chances of the two-state option ever being realized, which currently appears to be our grim reality today. But the results are also an expression of the growing acceptance on both sides that it is inconceivable for either state to live without dominating the other — and therefore impossible to live in peace.

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