When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

AL JAZEERA, BBC, LAHORE TIMES (Pakistan)

Worldcrunch

KARACHI/QUETTA/SWAT- Pakistan has declared three days of mourning after a string of bombings killed more than 100 people, while nine others died in separate shootings.

[rebelmouse-image 27086151 alt="""" original_size="330x353" expand=1]

Photo: CIA via Wikipedia

In the northwest city of Quetta, a suicide bomber entered a snooker club on Thursday that was close to a police station and a Shia mosque. As soon as the blast went off, the building collapsed. As rescue teams and reporters rushed to the scene, a second blast went off.

More than 80 people died and more than 120 were reported injured. Al Jazeera reports that Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, a Sunni Muslim extremist group, has claimed responsibility for the double bombing.

According to The Lahore Times, included in the death toll are four police officers, four rescue workers, a camera man and a news agency photographer.

A senior government official told the BBC that he believed the bombings were the group's reaction to incidents on Wednesday when a Sunni cleric was killed, and arms and ammunition were seized from a suspected Lashkar-e-Jhangvi hideout.

Another explosion at a religious gathering north of Peshawar, in the Swat Valley, killed 25 and wounded at least 70. The explosion occurred during a Muslim leader's speech where 1,500 people were gathered. The Lahore Times says that 25 kilograms of explosive material was used.

In addition to the explosions, nine people were shot in separate incidents in Karachi, the southern seaport and Pakistan's largest city.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

The Xi-Putin Alliance Is Dead, Long Live The Xi-Putin Alliance

The façade of unity between Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin was lifted in Uzbekistan last week. But where exactly does the Chinese head of state stand on the Russian invasion of Ukraine? Beijing is still establishing its place in the world, and it remains in contradiction to the West

China's President Xi Jinping, Uzbekistan's President Shavkat Mirziyoyev and Russia's President Vladimir Putin during the 22nd Summit of the SCO

Gregor Schwung

-Analysis-

Xi Jinping is not out of practice. The Chinese President's public demeanor on his first foreign trip since January 2020 was as confident as ever. When meeting Russian President Vladimir Putin on the sidelines of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) summit in Samarkand, Uzbekistan, he promptly removed his mask and stood inches away from the Russian president, smiling affably.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

What looked routine to the outside world was a diplomatic tightrope walk that the Chinese leader felt compelled to perform. It was the first face-to-face meeting between the two leaders since February, when they proclaimed a "friendship without borders" at the Winter Olympics in Beijing. Shortly thereafter, Putin launched his campaign against Ukraine – and the world wondered whether Putin had used his Olympic visit to obtain Xi's approval for his invasion.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ